An Innocent Man Facing Execution in Georgia

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Offline Im_convincedmjalive

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An Innocent Man Facing Execution in Georgia

  • on: January 16, 2011, 09:26:35 PM
http://www.troyanthonydavis.org/

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An Innocent Man Facing Execution in Georgia
Troy Anthony Davis hearing: Wednesday, June 23, 2010
Innocence claim rejected
Troy Davis loses challenge
August 24, 2010 -- News Coverage Here
Troy Davis and the appeal puzzle:  ScotusBlog Oct 22, 2010

INNOCENCE MATTERS!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troy_Anthony_Davis
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Troy Anthony Davis (born October 9, 1968) was convicted for the August 19, 1989, murder of Savannah, Georgia, police officer Mark MacPhail. In 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered that an evidentiary hearing be conducted to examine alleged recantations by trial witnesses and determine if clear and convincing evidence existed to prove Davis' innocence. On August 24, 2010, the conviction was upheld, with the court declaring, "Davis is not innocent."

Davis has been on death row in the U.S. state of Georgia since 1991. Throughout the original trial and subsequent appeals, Davis maintained his innocence, claiming he was wrongfully convicted of the crime as a result of false identification. Between the trial and first set of appeals, seven of the nine prosecution eyewitnesses who had linked Davis to the killing have unofficially recanted or contradicted part of their original trial testimony, claiming police coercion and questionable interrogation tactics, but none have made a formal recantation as required by law. The witness who first implicated Davis and has remained consistent, Sylvester "Redd" Coles, was initially a suspect in the crime. Coles was seen acting suspiciously the night of MacPhail's murder. One person has claimed that Coles boasted at a party that he killed an off-duty police officer. One witness did not recant his testimony and is not himself a suspect in the murder; he made an in-court identification of Davis at the original trial.

In October 2008, Davis filed a second Habeas petition in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals on the grounds that it was the first time Davis was presenting a free-standing innocence claim and that no court has yet held an evidentiary hearing on the exculpatory evidence of recanted testimony. On 16 April 2009, the three-judge panel denied Davis' petition on procedural grounds by a 2–1 majority. On 17 August 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court, over the dissenting votes of two justices, ordered a federal district court in Georgia to consider and rule on whether new evidence "that could not have been obtained at the time of trial clearly establishes [Davis'] innocence."

Davis was given an opportunity to present new evidence at a hearing in federal court in Savannah in June 2010, but he put on only a paucity of testimony. He did not take the stand in his defense, and not call Sylvester Coles as a witness. He also did not call some of the other witnesses who had given affidavits on his behalf, even though some of them were present in the courthouse. Savannah journalist Patrick Rodgers characterized the spartan hearing as a defeat for Davis, commenting, "Although the defense team had been arguing for a hearing like this since they took over the case, if the atmosphere ... was any implication, they seemed to be wishing they could have a second chance."

Amnesty International, a human rights organization, has taken up Davis' cause, although Amnesty International is officially neutral as to whether Davis is guilty or innocent. The advocacy group strongly condemned U.S. courts that refused to formally examine Davis' claimed exculpatory evidence, and has organized rallies and letter-writing campaigns to persuade the Georgia and Federal courts to grant Davis a new trial or an evidentiary hearing. Many prominent politicians and leaders, including former Georgia Governor and President Jimmy Carter, Al Sharpton, Pope Benedict XVI, Nobel laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Presidential candidate Bob Barr, and former FBI Director and judge William S. Sessions have called upon the courts to grant Davis a new trial or evidentiary hearing.
http://www.amnestyusa.org/death-penalty ... id=1121074

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Troy Davis - Case Background
Most recent update:
On August 17, the US Supreme Court issued an order mandating a new evidentiary hearing for Troy Davis. With its ruling, the nation's highest court decided that Davis should have another chance to prove his innocence before the state of Georgia puts him to death.

Background:
Restrictions on Federal appeals have prevented Troy Anthony Davis from having a hearing in federal court on the reliability of the witness testimony used against him, despite the fact that most of the witnesses have since recanted, many alleging they were pressured or coerced by police. Troy Davis remains on Georgia death row, and may be scheduled for execution in the near future.

Troy Davis was sentenced to death for the murder of Police Officer Mark Allen MacPhail at a Burger King in Savannah, Georgia; a murder he maintains he did not commit. There was no physical evidence against him and the weapon used in the crime was never found. The case against him consisted entirely of witness testimony which contained inconsistencies even at the time of the trial. Since then, all but two of the state's non-police witnesses from the trial have recanted or contradicted their testimony. Many of these witnesses have stated in sworn affidavits that they were pressured or coerced by police into testifying or signing statements against Troy Davis.

One of the two witnesses who has not recanted his testimony is Sylvester "Red" Coles – the principle alternative suspect, according to the defense, against whom there is new evidence implicating him as the gunman. Nine individuals have signed affidavits implicating Sylvester Coles.
 
First execution date
On June 25, 2007, Davis's first Certiorari petition to the US Supreme Court was denied, and his execution was then set for July 17, 2007.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

MJhasSpoken

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Re: An Innocent Man Facing Execution in Georgia

  • on: January 17, 2011, 04:50:24 AM
Unbelievable...justice is one of the hardest things to find in this world.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Lovely One

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Re: An Innocent Man Facing Execution in Georgia

  • on: January 17, 2011, 11:26:58 AM
This is terrible.  It can make you sick what happens to innocent people!  :cry:
Thank you for sharing!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »


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Offline everlastinglove_MJ

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Re: An Innocent Man Facing Execution in Georgia

  • on: January 18, 2011, 04:35:25 PM
I hate this terrible injustice concerning Troy Davis.
I am against death penalty. It is the ultimate denial of human rights. Because of judicial failures and/or corrupt authorities, some innocent people are being executed. I still remember a documentary I watched a few years ago. It was about a man, who claimed to be innocent, got executed by the lethal injection. Later, after the execution, he turned out to be innocent. It happens and it is heartbreaking..



The death penalty in 2009
More than two-thirds of the countries of the world have abolished the death penalty in law or in practice. While 58 countries retained the death penalty in 2009, most did not use it. Eighteen countries were known to have carried out executions, killing a total of at least 714 people; however, this figure does not include the thousands of executions that were likely to have taken place in China, which again refused to divulge figures on its use of the death penalty.

Methods of execution in 2009 included hanging, shooting, beheading, stoning, electrocution and lethal injection.

Where "+" is indicated after a country and it is preceded by a number, it means that the figure Amnesty International has calculated is a minimum figure. Where "+" is indicated after a country and is not preceded by a number, it indicates that there were executions or death sentences (at least more than one) in that country but it was not possible to calculate a figure

http://www.amnesty.org/en/death-penalty ... ns-in-2009
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline AgentBJ

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Re: An Innocent Man Facing Execution in Georgia

  • on: January 19, 2011, 11:00:17 AM
Omg...I have no words... :(
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline everlastinglove_MJ

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Re: An Innocent Man Facing Execution in Georgia

  • on: January 29, 2011, 05:33:18 AM
I was driven to tears when I read this news, I've no words for this....

Iranian-Dutch woman Zahra Bahrami hanged in Iran
Published on : 29 January 2011 - 9:12am | By RNW News Desk (Photo: ANP)
Reports from Iran say Iranian-Dutch woman Zahra Bahrami was hanged on Saturday for selling and possessing drugs. The authorities dismissed repeated pleas by the Netherlands which had sought details about her case.
Bahrami's execution is the latest in a slew of hangings carried out by the Islamic republic in January. Her execution takes the total number of people hanged in Iran so far this year to 66, according to media reports.
"A drug trafficker named Zahra Bahrami, daughter of Ali, was hanged early on Saturday morning after she was convicted of selling and possessing drugs," the Tehran prosecutor's office said.
Bahrami, a 46-year-old Iranian-born naturalised Dutch citizen, was reportedly arrested in December 2009 after joining a protest against the government while visiting relatives in the Islamic republic.
The prosecutor's office confirmed on Saturday that she had been arrested for "security crimes."
"Drug gang"
But elaborating on her alleged drug smuggling, the office said Bahrami had used her Dutch connections to smuggle narcotics into Iran.
"The convict, a member of an international drug gang, smuggled cocaine to Iran using her Dutch connections and had twice shipped and distributed cocaine inside the country," it said.
During a search of her house, authorities found 450 grams of cocaine and 420 grams of opium, the prosecutor's office said, adding that investigations revealed she had sold 150 grams of cocaine in Iran.
"The revolutionary court sentenced her to death for possessing 450 grams of cocaine and participating in the selling of 150 grams of cocaine," it said.
The Netherlands had been seeking details about Bahrami's case and had accused the Iranian authorities of refusing the Dutch embassy access to the prisoner because they did not recognise her dual nationality.
"I cannot confirm (her execution). Iranian media announced the news, we have not yet been approached by the Iranian authorities," Bengt van Loosdrecht, a Dutch foreign ministry spokesman, told AFP on Saturday.
Dutch concern
On January 5, Dutch Foreign Minister Uri Rosenthal expressed "extreme concern" about Bahrami, and said that he had "asked the Iranian authorities to provide immediate clarification" about her case.
"We insist on information, the possibility to provide her with consular assistance, and a fair course of justice," Rosenthal said in a statement at the time.
Radio Netherlands Worldwide, quoting Bahrami's daughter Banafsheh Najebpour, had reported earlier this month that Bahrami was awaiting trial in a second capital case in which she was accused of being in an armed opposition group.
Bahrami's execution brought the total number of people hanged so far this year in the Islamic republic to 66, according to an AFP tally based on media reports.
There has been a spike in hangings this year in Iran, especially of convicted drug smugglers.
The spate of executions has drawn criticism from Catherine Ashton, Europe's chief diplomat and the point person in talks between world powers and Iran over Tehran's controversial nuclear programme.
"The European Union is deeply concerned about the use of the death penalty in Iran. Executions are taking place at an alarming rate," she said on Thursday.
Ashton's statement came after Iranian state media on Thursday reported the hanging of 10 drug traffickers.
"In addition, abhorrent practices such as public executions and suspension hanging continue to be used, in contravention of Iran’s international obligations," added Ashton, restating the EU policy of global opposition to capital punishment.
Along with China, Saudi Arabia and the United States, Iran has one of the highest numbers of executions each year, with adultery, murder, drug trafficking and other major crimes all punishable by death.
© ANP/AFP
http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/irani ... anged-iran
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