Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

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Offline Sinderella

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Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 08:45:55 AM
http://http://www.law.com/jsp/tx/PubArticleTX.jsp?id=1202479658686&slreturn=1&hbxlogin=1

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Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares for His High-Stakes Defense of  Dr. Conrad Murray
January 31, 2011

At a preliminary hearing in the criminal case against Michael Jackson's doctor, Conrad Murray, lawyer Ed Chernoff had a ready response when Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor expressed his concern over Chernoff's cross-examination of a police detective by saying, "Houston, we have a problem. . . ."
"You have been waiting all week to say that," Chernoff, a partner in Houston's Stradley Chernoff & Alford, recalls telling the judge.

The Jan. 7 exchange stands out as a rare moment of levity for Chernoff during the 18 stressful months he has represented Murray, a Houston-based cardiologist. On Feb. 8, 2010, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office charged Murray with involuntary manslaughter in connection with the June 25, 2009, death of Jackson from a lethal dose of Propofol.

The DA's office alleges Murray "did unlawfully, and without malice, kill Michael Joseph Jackson . . . in the commission of an unlawful act, not amounting to a felony; and in the commission of a lawful act which might have produced death, in an unlawful manner, and without due caution and circumspection."

After the conclusion of the preliminary hearing, Pastor ruled on Jan. 11 that there is sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial. Murray pleaded not guilty at his Jan. 25 arraignment.

The representation of Murray, which has drawn international attention due to Jackson's star power, has not been easy for Chernoff or for his firm. "We've handled lots of high-profile cases. It's one thing when you have three cameras out there as you leave the courthouse. It is another when it's 300," Chernoff says.

Chernoff and partner Bill Stradley say Murray's defense has taxed their firm's time and resources; forced them to figure out how best to handle the deluge of media inquiries; and required major case-juggling among the five lawyers at the firm.

"We are a small firm. We tend to share everything — caseloads and revenues," Stradley says. "The complexity and travel requirements of this case, all of those things have been a significant investment. Having one partner focused primarily on this case, we have had to adjust on a weekly basis how to distribute the workload."

Jokes Stradley, "I'm not playing nearly as much golf as I used to, but I used to play a lot, and that's OK, because we all recognize that this is important."
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LMFAO!!!!! Oh,nevermind...only a manslaughter trial,go hit a few balls no one will notice....

The notoriety of the case has generated new business for the firm, but not much, Stradley says. "It's not like by virtue of having this case, suddenly you have to fend them off at the door, but clients have a greater comfort level of our ability to deal with significant issues," he notes.

Chernoff says the firm uses its website as the main means to quickly inform the public and press of new information about Murray's case, all in an effort to ensure prospective Los Angeles jurors see and hear correct information. Murray has even posted a video on YouTube — which was taped at Chernoff's residence — to let his patients know he's OK and grateful for their concern.

Murray hired Chernoff within 48 hours of Jackson's death. [See "Best Course of Treatment," Texas Lawyer, July 20, 2009, page 5.] Since then, Chernoff has been shuttling from Houston to Los Angeles on a regular basis. Chernoff says last fall he leased an apartment in Hollywood to reduce hotel costs and he learned to stop answering his cell phone when he didn't recognize the number.

Chernoff says in July he even took and passed the California bar exam — although he still has to be sworn in as a member. Four weeks before the test, he began getting up at 3 a.m. to study using 3-year-old books he bought on CraigsList. He says he lucked out on the bar exam, because two of the essay questions were about criminal law. He says he took the California bar exam because he didn't want to risk losing his pro hac vice status.

Chernoff says in December 2009 he interviewed about a dozen lawyers but decided on J. Michael Flanagan, a partner in Glendale, Calif.'s Flanagan, Unger & Grover. Chernoff says he chose Flanagan because Flanagan successfully defended two California nurses charged with involuntary manslaughter for allegedly administering Propofol to a patient who died.

Despite the challenges of Murray's case, Chernoff says he can't complain. "I promised him I wouldn't abandon him," he says of Murray. "And we get paid well for what we do, by any standard." Chernoff adds, "I'm not positioned in life that I could afford to do this for free."
Some Strategy

Only the prosecution presented evidence at the hearing, because the defense chose only to cross-examine prosecution witnesses rather than put on an affirmative defense. And the prosecution won.

"Michael is not here with us today because of the actions of an utterly inept, incompetent, reckless doctor, the defendant, Conrad Murray," Deputy District Attorney David Walgren told the court on Jan. 11. In summing up the evidence presented at the hearing, Walgren said that the prosecution's witnesses testified that Murray had spent time hiding evidence "at the time his attention should be on his patient," and failed to tell a paramedic about the Propofol in Jackson's system — all of which reflects on Murray's "consciousness of guilt."

Walgren also noted that records showed Murray had been reading and sending e-mails after he found Jackson not breathing, according to a timeline the doctor gave police. "What you also have to assume then is Dr. Murray allowed Michael Jackson, allowed him to lay dead or dying an hour before 911 is called. . . . Now, if he is accurate and he waited an hour, or if he is lying about the time line, we have those two options. The third option can only be, and it is equally troubling, Dr. Murray is absolutely so utterly incompetent and reckless and inept that he has no idea what time he gave the medicine to Michael Jackson. He has no idea what he gave him or when," Walgren argued.

The defense countered Walgren's arguments by noting that no witnesses said an e-mail killed Jackson, nor did any suggest resuscitation or an earlier call to 911 would have altered his death. Murray's lawyers also noted that Murray was under stress the day Jackson died and he might have been mistaken about the timeline.

On Jan. 11, Pastor ruled there was sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial. California v. Conrad Robert Murray is scheduled to begin March 28.

Chernoff says he and Flanagan had no doubts the judge would rule there was sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial, so they didn't waste their time with affirmative defenses at the hearing. They also didn't want to give prosecutors a preview of their trial strategy.

As part of that strategy, Chernoff says he decided not to waive his client's right to a speedy trial. Without the waiver, California law requires prosecutors to begin presenting their case within 60 days of Murray's Jan. 25 arraignment.

Two chief factors contributed to the defense lawyers' decision to go to trial sooner rather than later, Chernoff and Flanagan say. For example, on Jan. 11, the last day of the six-day preliminary hearing , Pastor suspended Murray's license to practice medicine in California pending the outcome of his trial. Chernoff says he wants Murray's trial to start quickly before additional authorities have a chance to strip the doctor of his Texas and Nevada medical licenses.

A loss of his Texas license would diminish Murray's income and his ability to pay for his defense, not to mention affect the well-being of the doctor's patients and Murray's sense of purpose.

Flanagan says another reason for a speedy trial has to do with the testimony presented by the 24 witnesses prosecutors called at the preliminary hearing — testimony he says "went in opposite directions," which will help the defense raise reasonable doubt at trial. A speedy trial gives the prosecution less time to fix the problems with their case, Flanagan says.

During the hearing, Flanagan says the prosecution changed its theories about what took place in Jackson's home — specifically regarding the Propofol. According to a transcript of the hearing, in his opening statement Walgren talked about Murray "slowly infusing Michael with an injection of Propofol."

But Flanagan elicited testimony showing Jackson could have ingested the Propofol himself. During Flanagan's cross-examination of prosecution witness Dr. Richard Ruffalo, Ruffalo conceded he had mistaken "micrograms" for "milligrams" when measuring concentrations of Jackson's stomach contents from the coroner's toxicologist's report. "I didn't have my glasses on well," Ruffalo testified. Ruffalo also said that properly re-calculated numbers may lead to the conclusion that Jackson "self-ingested" or "drank" some of the Propofol as opposed to Murray administering all of the drug to Jackson. However, Ruffalo testified that Murray was still responsible for leaving the drug unattended in Jackson's presence.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office declines comment for this article. "We have a pending case and it would be inappropriate for us to engage in the type of out-of-court discussion that you are seeking," writes spokeswoman Sandi Gibbons.

Given how closely he has become identified with Murray's case, Chernoff knows the stakes. "If I walk out with my client at the end of the trial, it's going to have a tremendous impact on my practice. If I don't walk out[with him], I'm going to be the guy who lost the biggest trial since O.J. Simpson's."


Love how it has tomorrow's date on it.
Bringing you the news,the day before it happens ; )

p.s is this a joke?He can't play as much golf because he has more work to do handling Murray's case?I can't stop laughing.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Grace

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 09:14:26 AM
What a bunch of ... where are the garbage bins?

He's getting up in his Hollywood apartment at 3 a.m. to study 3 year old books he found in CraigsList for his exam at the CA bar?
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Craigslist is a centralized network of online communities, featuring free online classified advertisements – with sections devoted to jobs, housing, personals, for sale, services, community, gigs, résumés, and discussion forums.
http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craigslist

Good luck - Houston, we got indeed a problem.  
:lol:

The only interesting part is this:
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he didn't want to risk losing his pro hac vice status

"pro hac vice status" is
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a legal term usually referring to a lawyer who has not been admitted to practice in a certain jurisdiction but has been allowed to participate in a particular case in that jurisdiction
http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pro_hac_vice
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A fictional example of a pro hac vice appearance occurs in the film The Devil's Advocate,

The movie plot for "The Devil's Advocate" leads us to:
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Breaking the fourth wall, he says, "Vanity, definitely my favorite sin."
http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Devil%27s_Advocate_%28film%29

What is a "fourth wall"?
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The fourth wall is the imaginary "wall" at the front of the stage in a traditional three-walled box set in a proscenium theatre, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play
http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_wall
« Last Edit: January 30, 2011, 09:28:05 AM by Grace »
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Offline Sinderella

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 09:14:36 AM
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Murray hired Chernoff within 48 hours of Jackson's death. [See "Best Course of Treatment," Texas Lawyer, July 20, 2009, page 5.]

Here is that article;

http://http://www.law.com/jsp/tx/PubArticleTX.jsp?id=1202432336515

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Best Course of Treatment: Representing Michael Jackson's Personal M.D.
Texas Lawyer
July 20, 2009


What does a criminal-defense lawyer do when the whole world points a finger at his client?

If you're Houston lawyer Ed Chernoff and your client was the King of Pop's personal physician, you enlist the help of your partners in an effort to redirect the 24/7 news cycle and show how your client cooperated with police — then you hope for the best and prepare for the worst.

Chernoff, a partner in Houston's Stradley, Chernoff & Alford, represents Dr. Conrad Murray, who on June 25 found Michael Jackson in bed not breathing but with a pulse. Murray tried to resuscitate Jackson, 50, and then rode with him in the ambulance to the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center where the singer died that day.

With Jackson's death came nearly instantaneous reports in the media that the megastar may have been abusing prescription medications. And with that news, Murray was thrust into the spotlight.

"Every decision we have made we have had in mind that [Los Angeles prosecutors] could charge Dr. Murray, irrespective of his guilt," Chernoff says, adding that his client did nothing wrong.

At the hospital on June 25, shortly after Jackson died, Los Angeles Police Department officials questioned Murray — who is licensed to practice medicine in Texas, Nevada and California. That same day, the LAPD impounded Murray's car so authorities could search for evidence. The doctor was not represented by a lawyer at the time, Chernoff says.

But by the mid-afternoon on June 26, Murray, who has offices in Houston and Las Vegas, had called Chernoff. Another Houston lawyer, who Chernoff declines to identify, recommended his firm to Murray. When Murray called, Chernoff says he was 50 percent sure it was a hoax so he insisted Murray wire money for at least a portion of his $1,200 last-minute plane ticket to California before he agreed to fly out there.

Chernoff says Murray recognized he needed a lawyer because "all hell broke" after Jackson's death. Murray hired "legal counsel to help guide him through the police investigation process" and "to make sure the police investigation is conducted properly," Chernoff says.

The evening of June 26, Chernoff says he flew from Houston to California to meet with Murray at the Ritz-Carlton in Marina del Rey, a location the two men picked to avoid the paparazzi. Murray relied upon his partners William Stradley and Matt Alford — all three are former assistant district attorneys in Harris County who have been in private practice together since 1999 — to handle matters in Houston. Alford says before Chernoff left for California he called Alford to say Murray had hired the firm and Chernoff needed help and their expertise on police procedures. Alford says he promised Chernoff that he would "hold down the fort in Houston," while Chernoff flew West to meet their new client. [See "Houston Lawyer Representing Doctor With Michael Jackson When He Died," Texas Lawyer, Tex Parte Blog, June 29, 2009.]

At the Ritz-Carlton, Murray and Chernoff created an office in a private room at the hotel restaurant. On June 26 and June 27, Chernoff says, he began negotiating with the LAPD regarding the police's scheduled second interview of Murray. Chernoff says he asked the LAPD officers to meet Murray and himself at the hotel to avoid unwanted press attention. And Chernoff says he asked the police to control leaks. "The agreement with them right from the get-go was no leaks," recalls Chernoff, "with the understanding that you can't protect completely from leaks in the long term."

"At that initial point of time . . . you hope you can keep things pretty clean. First, you want to know where the police's initial investigation is headed. You certainly don't want the investigation to be politicized. We knew everyone is looking for someone to blame. So you identify where the investigation is heading and how that is going to fit into what your client is going to tell them."

On June 27, the LAPD issued a press release regarding Murray stating: "On June 27, 2009, Dr. Conrad Murray, the physician who was with Michael Jackson at the time of his collapse, voluntarily contacted the Los Angeles Police Department. Detectives assigned to Robbery-Homicide Division met with Dr. Murray and conducted an extensive interview. Dr. Murray was cooperative and provided information which will aid the investigation." Tenesha Dobine, a spokeswoman for the LAPD, says the department has not issued any more statements regarding Murray.

The weekend after Jackson's death, Chernoff didn't sleep much. On June 27, Chernoff says, he was too busy with Murray and the police to pay attention to the dozens of emergency text messages he received from his partners in Houston.

By mid-morning June 27, Alford recalls, the rollercoaster started. The Houston Chronicle posted a story identifying Chernoff and his partners as Murray's counsel, Alford says, and within a half an hour, "the top blew off things." His BlackBerry, where calls to the firm's office were forwarded, began ringing every 30 seconds with calls from reporters, Alford says. Local television news trucks parked outside Alford's house. Network news representatives began calling to request interviews with Murray.

Alford needed help. So he called Stradley, who was looking forward to a week of vacation having just finished preparing for trial on another case. Stradley recalls his wife, who picked up the phone, told him that Alford wanted him to put on a suit and go over to his house. Puzzled and not yet up to speed on Murray's situation, Stradley went to Alford's house and they began splitting up the task of returning the press calls. Having talked only briefly to Chernoff, Alford and Stradley attempted to correct what they say was misinformation about Murray that was dominating the 24/7 news cycle. They stressed to reporters that Murray intended to cooperate with the police and that he was not stonewalling. Indeed, they told reporters that Murray was about to meet with the LAPD for a second time, recalls Stradley.

Alford sought additional reinforcements. He called Tammy Kidd, a former Harris County prosecutor who now works with Miranda Sevcik, the founder of Houston-based media consulting firm Media Masters. Alford says he asked Kidd and Sevcik to help them manage the press. By the early afternoon on June 27, Alford, Stradley, Kidd and Sevcik all were busy fielding press calls.

Sometime that Saturday, Alford says, the firm's Web site suffered a blowout from too many hits. He had Sevcik and Kidd work to fix the problem and establish a blog devoted to Chernoff's press statements regarding Murray. Since then, Chernoff has used the blog to provide reporters with updated information about Murray.

During those first days with his client in California, Chernoff knew publicity would factor into his representation of Murray, but he "wasn't fully aware of how crazy it was going to get," he says.

Chernoff and Murray met with the LAPD at the Ritz-Carlton the evening of June 27; Chernoff declines to say what his client told the police. After the three-hour meeting, Chernoff says he spoke with his partners in Houston. "When I finally got hold of them, then I realized the magnitude of the interest and was able to start looking at some of the preliminary press reports," he recalls.

Initially, Chernoff says, he told Alford to stop returning reporters' phone calls. But Chernoff says Alford told him, "You are not going to shut anything down. You don't know what the f**k is happening." Then Sevcik got on the phone to tell Chernoff that a "Dateline NBC" news producer wanted him to appear on the television show. Chernoff taped the show in Los Angeles on Sunday June 28. During the broadcast, Chernoff says he was able to deliver his main messages about his client: Murray was cooperating with police; he did not prescribe Demerol or Oxycontin to Jackson; he had only treated Jackson for a short period of time; and other doctors had treated and prescribed medication for Jackson.

Chernoff didn't get to watch the Sunday "Dateline" broadcast since he was on a plane to Houston when it aired. When he got home, he slept for only a few hours, then he, his partners and the PR team met and decided they needed more TV appearances to get their message out about Murray. The morning of Monday June 29, Chernoff and Alford made their way to a Houston TV studio to appear on all of the network morning news programs, as well as on CNN and Fox News.

Chernoff believes the blitz that Monday helped his client. Sevcik says before the media interviews, she looked at roughly 100 comments posted on 20 different Web sites and only about 25 percent of those comments said Murray was an innocent bystander in Jackson's death. After the Monday media appearances by Chernoff and Alford, that figure rose to 75 percent, Sevcik says.

Chernoff stresses that his client did nothing wrong and Chernoff wants to make sure the public knows that. The message is especially important in case Murray is charged with a crime, because it will improve Murray's chances of an unbiased jury pool and getting a fair trial. "It's different when you are working with an innocent client. If you have a guilty client, you shut up. But we still believe once toxicology is finally and fully done that our client is going to be proven to be innocent," Chernoff says.

The Los Angeles County Coroner's Office performed an autopsy on Jackson's body on June 26, but it has not yet determined the cause of death, and the toxicology report is not complete. "I don't think anyone knows when it's going to be released," says Stradley.

On June 30, Chernoff flew to Las Vegas to bring Murray a secure cell phone to prevent electronic eavesdropping as well as to collect certain documents. Chernoff says, given the death threats the doctor has received, Murray is reluctant about seeing patients. Murray now travels with a bodyguard and most of the time he stays at his Las Vegas home in a gated community.

Chernoff says he is in constant contact with the LAPD, and officers may want to interview Murray again. "We will be happy to meet with them. We just don't want to get into irrelevant discussions," Chernoff says. If prescription medications were responsible for Jackson's death, "we are completely in the dark about the drugs that were in [Jackson's] system. We're completely in the dark about what drugs would have killed him."

Chernoff states "unequivocally" on his blog that "there was no Demerol or Oxycontin administered or prescribed by Dr. Murray" to Jackson and that "Dr. Murray didn't prescribe anything that should have killed Michael Jackson. . . . There's nothing in his history, nothing that Dr. Murray knew, that would lead him to believe [Jackson] would go into sudden cardiac arrest or respiratory failure. There was no red flag available to Dr. Murray, which led him to believe [Jackson] would have died the way he did. It's still a mystery how he died."
Who Is Ed Chernoff?

After graduating from the University of Houston Law Center in 1987, Chernoff worked as a prosecutor until 1991 in the Harris County District Attorney's Office, which then was led by DA Johnny Holmes. On his job application, Chernoff wrote that his hobbies included "sleeping and eating."

At the DA's office, he earned a reputation as a talented trial lawyer with a sharp wit, according to supervisors' comments in his personnel file, which Chernoff provided to Texas Lawyer .

Since starting in private practice, Chernoff has handled some big cases, but he says he has never had a client who attracted as much media attention as Murray. In 2003, Chernoff defended Steven Puffer, who was acquitted by a jury after 15 minutes of deliberation for allegedly hacking into the Harris County district clerk's wireless computer system. That same year, Chernoff won an acquittal for Roland Angelle, who was alleged to have pulled a gun on legendary plaintiffs lawyer Walter Umphrey of Beaumont's Provost HUmphrey.

Mention Chernoff to other lawyers who've handled high-profile clients and cases and they note his affinity for body-building and tattoos, at least one of which was acquired during a three-month sabbatical from the DA's office during which Chernoff drove a motorcycle around the country. They also say he and his partners are excellent lawyers.

"I think Ed, Matt and Bill have done a superb job and done an excellent job of making clear their client was cooperating with police," says Chip B. Lewis, a Houston criminal-defense solo who represented Kenneth Lay, former chairman and chief executive officer of Houston's Enron Corp., who in 2006 was found guilty of conspiracy, fraud and making false statements. Lewis also represented Robert Durst, the heir to a real-estate empire who in 2003 was acquitted of murder for allegedly killing his 71-year-old Galveston neighbor.

Rusty Hardin of Houston's Rusty Hardin & Associates, who has represented Arthur Andersen LLP and baseball player Roger Clemens, supervised Chernoff when they both worked in the DA's office. Hardin says Chernoff is an excellent attorney with a great sense of humor. He warns, however, that Chernoff will have to be careful about what he says regarding the Jackson case because of the media attention. Hardin says Chernoff has done well in the couple of interviews Hardin has seen on TV. But Hardin says he has discovered through experience that with some high-profile clients, specifically with Clemens, it's better to stop returning reporters' phone calls.

Johnny Sutton, the former U.S. attorney for the Western District of Texas who recently launched the Austin office of Ashcroft Sutton Ratcliffe, also worked with Chernoff when they were assistant DAs in Harris County. Sutton says Chernoff "has a great sense of humor. He is wickedly smart. He beats to a different drummer but that makes him much more powerful in the courtroom."

But Dan Cogdell of Houston's Cogdell Law Firm, who represents Laura Pendergest-Holt, the former chief investment officer at Stanford Financial Group who was the first executive charged in the government's investigation of R. Allen Stanford's financial companies, says he has concerns about how much talking Chernoff and his partners have done with the press. "It's admirable if it's accurate, but it's devastating if it isn't," he says about the details Chernoff has provided about Murray's activities before and after Jackson's death. If Chernoff and his partners are relying on Murray's account of events exclusively, they may have problems, Cogdell predicts. At this early stage of an investigation, Cogdell says, clients are not always reliable about getting all the facts right. "The older I get the more I take the position that I have never won a case in the press, although I have lost a few," Cogdell says.

Similarly, David Botsford advises that Chernoff and his partners be cautious when dealing with the press. Botsford is a partner in Austin's Botsford & Roark who represented two U.S. Border Patrol agents in their appeals of convictions for shooting an illegal immigrant. Earlier this year, then-President George W. Bush commuted the former agents' sentences. "You always have to put the clients' interest as paramount," Botsford says. "Lawyers can get into a conflict of wanting to generate press, which helps the lawyer, but can also hurt your client. You have to constantly remind yourself of that. The major rule is if in doubt, don't talk."

Chernoff says Murray's freedom is his priority. "If this case is charged, I worry greatly about Dr. Murray because it's going to be a long trial, incredibly expensive, expert costs are going to eat it up. Real justice is only obtained if you have the money to really do what is necessary. My big concern is that Dr. Murray or any private citizen wouldn't have the money." Chernoff says Murray "doesn't have a pot to piss in," and Chernoff doesn't even know if he will get paid for his legal services.

For the three lawyers at Stradley, Chernoff & Alford, their new client has been all-consuming. Notes Chernoff, "It has taken up a lot of our time and a lot of energy and thought process, but my clients have been great. And the lawyers in Houston have been great. That is one of the great things about lawyers in Texas. People are extremely pleased that there are Texas lawyers involved in this case."
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Online ~Souza~

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 09:41:18 AM
AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Can't stop laughing! This guy needs his own show! I wanted to quote the parts that I thought were funny or plain out ridiculous, but in that case I would need to quote the complete article, but it already started right at the beginning:


Quote
At a preliminary hearing in the criminal case against Michael Jackson's doctor, Conrad Murray, lawyer Ed Chernoff had a ready response when Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor expressed his concern over Chernoff's cross-examination of a police detective by saying, "Houston, we have a problem. . . ."
"You have been waiting all week to say that
," Chernoff, a partner in Houston's Stradley Chernoff & Alford, recalls telling the judge.

Keep it coming guys, I need a good laugh at times!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline trustno1

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 09:56:03 AM
I agree, hilarious from the start!  The problem is most non-believers will swallow this as serious, which would also be funny if it wasn't so disturbing! I wonder if even MJ considered that it would take THIS long for the rest of the world to wake up and start paying attention!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 10:04:33 AM
Quote from: "trustno1"
I agree, hilarious from the start!  The problem is most non-believers will swallow this as serious, which would also be funny if it wasn't so disturbing! I wonder if even MJ considered that it would take THIS long for the rest of the world to wake up and start paying attention!
I wonder the same. I mean how ridiculous should the story get before they will see they've been punk'd?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline trustno1

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 10:10:28 AM
Actually, I was just thinking that the general public has been conditioned by the media for so long regarding Michael that the bizarre is probably what they'd expect, so I suppose it would have to be something utterly ridiculous and impossible like all defense/prosecution teams suddenly turning up at court wearing the Thriller jacket and carrying a chimp.  Now that I'd like to see! ;) The circus rolls on...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Sinderella

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 02:16:56 PM
Quote from: "~Souza~"
Quote from: "trustno1"
I agree, hilarious from the start!  The problem is most non-believers will swallow this as serious, which would also be funny if it wasn't so disturbing! I wonder if even MJ considered that it would take THIS long for the rest of the world to wake up and start paying attention!
I wonder the same. I mean how ridiculous should the story get before they will see they've been punk'd?


Oh they are,I will quote a comment I saw earlier

Quote
Yvonne Francis
Where did you get this from? OMG! This is not about the murder of Michael Joseph Jackson.... it's about winning this damn case and stroking thier freaking egos!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

lol.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Dancer

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 02:36:18 PM
English is not my native language. Is this a usual sentence?
Quote
Dr. Murray allowed Michael Jackson, allowed him to lay dead or dying an hour before 911 is called. . . .
"Allowed him to" sounds very strange to me...?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Akon on MJ, May 2009]The way he thinks....some artists think regional, some think national, I was thinking international. He thinks planets. It\'s on another level...[/size][/color]

Offline mjssoulmate

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 03:04:28 PM
Given how closely he has become identified with Murray's case, Chernoff knows the stakes. "If I walk out with my client at the end of the trial, it's going to have a tremendous impact on my practice. If I don't walk out[with him], I'm going to be the guy who lost the biggest trial since O.J. Simpson's."

So Chernoff is expecting to lose this trial.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Heartsong

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 30, 2011, 05:07:40 PM
"...mistook micrograms for milligrams. Didn't have my glasses on...." Mwahhhhahaha!! :lol: You're bloody joking aren't you? Really?

My local vet would do a better job on the family moggie. One would think that the greatest entertainer in the world would be entitled to slightly :roll: better care...Everything I read about this case makes me so ANGRY!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinions but no one is entitled to their own facts" ~ Nobel Laureate, Elizabeth Blackburn

Offline Sinderella

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Re: Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares

  • on: January 31, 2011, 06:54:46 PM
I just read it all again and realised it sounds like the script from one of those legal type comdey shows on sky hahahaha
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »