Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart / Michael Jackson

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Offline happythoughts

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart / Michael Jackson

  • on: February 11, 2011, 11:22:28 PM
I was watching a movie in choir about Mozart and I couldn't help but notice how much he reminded me of a certain person ;) . So I read about Mozart and I found the similarities were profound. Check it out, I've posted the things I found relevant, bolded the things I thought were crazy similar.

   
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Mozart's physical appearance was described by tenor Michael Kelly, in his Reminiscences: "a remarkably small man, very thin and pale, with a profusion of fine, fair hair of which he was rather vain". As his early biographer Niemetschek wrote, "there was nothing special about [his] physique. He was small and his countenance, except for his large intense eyesgave no signs of his genius." His facial complexion was pitted, a reminder of his childhood case of smallpox. He loved elegant clothing. Kelly remembered him at a rehearsal: "[He] was on the stage with his crimson pelisse (Michael wore these) and gold-laced cocked hat, giving the time of the music to the orchestra." Of his voice Constanze later wrote that it "was a tenor, rather soft in speaking and delicate in singing, but when anything excited him, or it became necessary to exert it, it was both powerful and energetic".
Mozart usually worked long and hard, finishing compositions at a tremendous pace as deadlines approached. He often made sketches and drafts; unlike Beethoven's these are mostly not preserved, as Constanze sought to destroy them after his death.

Mozart lived at the center of the Viennese musical world, and knew a great number and variety of people: fellow musicians, theatrical performers, fellow Salzburgers, and aristocrats, including some acquaintance with the Emperor Joseph II...Leutgeb and Mozart carried on a curious kind of friendly mockery, often with Leutgeb as the butt of Mozart's practical jokes.

He enjoyed billiards and dancing, and kept pets: a canary, a starling, a dog, and also a horse for recreational riding.

It is only through recognizing the violence and sensuality at the center of Mozart's work that we can make a start towards a comprehension of his structures and an insight into his magnificence. In a paradoxical way, Schumann's superficial characterization of the G minor Symphony can help us to see Mozart's daemon more steadily. In all of Mozart's supreme expressions of suffering and terror, there is something shockingly voluptuous.

Mozart fell ill while in Prague for the premiere on 6 September of his opera La clemenza di Tito, written in 1791 on commission for the Emperor's coronation festivities.He was able to continue his professional functions for some time, and conducted the premiere of The Magic Flute on 30 September. The illness intensified on 20 November, at which point Mozart became bedridden, suffering from swelling, pain, and vomiting.

Mozart was nursed in his final illness by Constanze and her youngest sister Sophie, and attended by the family doctor, Thomas Franz Closset. It is clear that he was mentally occupied with the task of finishing his Requiem. However, the evidence that he actually dictated passages to his student Süssmayr is very slim.[64][65]

Mozart died at 1 a.m. on 5 December 1791 at the age of 35. (they both died young)


The cause of Mozart's death cannot be known with certainty. The official record has it as "hitziges Frieselfieber" ("severe miliary fever", referring to a rash that looks like millet seeds). Researchers have posited at least 118 causes of death, including trichinosis, influenza, mercury poisoning, and a rare kidney ailment. The most widely accepted hypothesis is that Mozart died of acute rheumatic fever.

Mozart's sparse funeral did not reflect his standing with the public as a composer: memorial services and concerts in Vienna and Prague were well attended. Indeed, in the period immediately after his death, Mozart's reputation rose substantially: Solomon describes an "unprecedented wave of enthusiasm" for his work; biographies were written (first by Schlichtegroll, Niemetschek, and Nissen) and publishers vied to produce complete editions of his works.(Like Moonwalk re-edition 2009)

 



Just a thought.
Blessings to everyone!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline SoldierofLOVE

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Re: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart / Michael Jackson

  • on: February 11, 2011, 11:34:52 PM
Michael is our Mozart.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline scorpionchik

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Re: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart / Michael Jackson

  • on: February 11, 2011, 11:39:21 PM
I would add couple similarities: Mozart started his composer carrier also 5 years old as MJ stepped on the stage; Mozart also was always subject of envy and jealousy, especially from Salieri who supposedly poisoned Mozart. That's how genius composer died. Then, Mozart was/is genius composer of classic music, MJ genius in Pop music, both talent was recognized in the early stage of carrier.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
EndlesslovetoMJ

Offline happythoughts

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Re: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart / Michael Jackson

  • on: February 12, 2011, 12:12:47 AM
Quote from: "scorpionchik"
I would add couple similarities: Mozart started his composer carrier also 5 years old as MJ stepped on the stage; Mozart also was always subject of envy and jealousy, especially from Salieri who supposedly poisoned Mozart. That's how genius composer died. Then, Mozart was/is genius composer of classic music, MJ genius in Pop music, both talent was recognized in the early stage of carrier.

Lovely, thank you. :D
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »