Ed Chernoff Discusses The Representation of Conrad Murray

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Offline likemike

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[youtube:rcr6r4za]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t26_9s0o-f0[/youtube:rcr6r4za]

...interesting at 3:36ish he says that he gets 3:00am phone calls from the guy who runs TMZ!! :lol:
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

RunFaYaLife

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He must be a patient man.
I would have lost it with on Mr TMZ and everyone else associated with
 celebrity head hunter's and others that are NOT associated with the case
that dared blew up my cell phone ...email or anything else. lol

There's this thing called client confidentiality.
  know what I mean Vern?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Online ~Souza~

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LMFAO, is this guy for real? His nickname is "Hollywood"? They got paid in advance and have no money? Sorry, got to watch this again, there was not much that made sense. I also thought I heard him say he wanted to make his Texas colleagues proud...

And why did they turn the camera at one point to that skeleton?

This looked completely staged and made me laugh for 9 minutes. Thanks for posting.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Sinderella

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Haha,Hollywood and broke....
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline sk2001

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Umm yah, totally staged! He actions and expressions are wayyy too dramatic for a professional lawyer but not for an actor. Have you seen celebrity/ Hollywood actors give interviews?? Whateverrrrr@ them for trying make fools of us :$
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline bec

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8:20-8:28

'I know a juror in Texas would dump this case with the kind of evidence we are going to present' (not verbatim) and he cracks. Look at his face at the end of the line. He smirks. He broke character for just one little second. See it?

What kind of evidence are you going to present, Chernoff?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Are you entertained?

Offline Lovely One

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WOW.....Just WOW.  :P






    HOAX!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :lol:
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »


"Those who were dancing were thought to be quite insane by those who could not
hear the music....."

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Quote from: "bec"
8:20-8:28

'I know a juror in Texas would dump this case with the kind of evidence we are going to present' (not verbatim) and he cracks. Look at his face at the end of the line. He smirks. He broke character for just one little second. See it?

What kind of evidence are you going to present, Chernoff?

Yes I see it too, he had to keep his face together :lol:

I am also curious about his evidence.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline ForstAMoon

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skeleton and the picture of Tien an men on the wall?

Somebody help me please!!!!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Online ~Souza~

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Quote from: "ForstAMoon"
skeleton and the picture of Tien an men on the wall?

Somebody help me please!!!!
Oh, it's Tienanmen square? I was already trying to see what it was, thanks!

Well that's quite some coincidental symbolism there...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline ForstAMoon

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Quote from: "~Souza~"
Quote from: "ForstAMoon"
skeleton and the picture of Tien an men on the wall?

Somebody help me please!!!!
Oh, it's Tienanmen square? I was already trying to see what it was, thanks!

Well that's quite some coincidental symbolism there...



by Stuart Franklin

http://www.stuartfranklin.com/albums?album=27
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Sarahli

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I notice the comparisons between Texas and California judicial system Mr. Chernoff makes... more independant in Texas rather than in Cali... and the skeleton is really in the screen on purpose  :lol:  but why?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
We are here for you Michael and will always love you whatever happens.
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Offline bec

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Skeleton from Ghosts, I presume...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Grace

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Oh did Mr. Chernoff exchange addresses for his favourite tie shopping experience with DCM?



The video claims to be an ALM production:
Quote
ALM, an integrated media company, is a leading provider of specialized business news and information, focused primarily on the legal and commercial real estate sectors. ALM serves its customers through the quality of our content, ongoing product innovation, dedication to customer service and a commitment to providing unique insight and analysis across these industries.
http://http://www.alm.com/


Anybody noticed the 7 baby photos behind him?
The shrunken head statue?

And this photo?



Quote
Three styles of architecture predominate in urban Beijing. First, the traditional architecture of imperial China, perhaps best exemplified by the massive Tian'anmen (Gate of Heavenly Peace), which remains the People's Republic of China's trademark edifice, the Forbidden City, the Imperial Ancestral Temple and the Temple of Heaven.
http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beijing

Quote
Tiananmen Square is a large city square in the centre of Beijing, China, named after the Tiananmen Gate (literally, Gate of Heaven's Pacification) located to its north, separating it from the Forbidden City. Tiananmen Square is the largest city square in the world (440,000 m² - 880m by 500m). It has great cultural significance as it was the site of several important events in Chinese history. The square was the center of the 4 June 1989 protests, where soldiers opened fire on protesters, killing 400–800, and perhaps many more

Quote
The protests of 1989 resulted in the massacre of Chinese protesters in the streets to the west of the square and adjacent areas. There are reports where soldiers opened fire on protesters, killing 400–800, and perhaps many more. Eyewitness accounts of the events on the night of June 3 and the early morning of June 4, 1989 continue to emerge from former student leaders and intellectuals, broadening the scope of the original reporting of the massacre by Western media outlets. This was the scene for the iconic image of Tank Man, where a column of PLA tanks was stopped in its tracks by a protester.
http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiananmen_Square
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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RunFaYaLife

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Ed Chernoff is a Texas Lawyer.
http://www.houstoncriminallaw.com/CM/At ... rnoff.html

Not buying the the hoax staged thing ....those are pictures of his family in the background. As far as skeleton's go and skulls for that matter...
Hey I like them too!
Does the skull necklace and ring I wear make me part of the death hoax?
 :idea:  :?:  :roll:
http://www.law.com/jsp/tx/PubArticleTX. ... hbxlogin=1

Quote
"You have been waiting all week to say that," Chernoff, a partner in Houston's Stradley Chernoff & Alford, recalls telling the judge.

The Jan. 7 exchange stands out as a rare moment of levity for Chernoff during the 18 stressful months he has represented Murray, a Houston-based cardiologist. On Feb. 8, 2010, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office charged Murray with involuntary manslaughter in connection with the June 25, 2009, death of Jackson from a lethal dose of Propofol.

The DA's office alleges Murray "did unlawfully, and without malice, kill Michael Joseph Jackson . . . in the commission of an unlawful act, not amounting to a felony; and in the commission of a lawful act which might have produced death, in an unlawful manner, and without due caution and circumspection."

After the conclusion of the preliminary hearing, Pastor ruled on Jan. 11 that there is sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial. Murray pleaded not guilty at his Jan. 25 arraignment.

The representation of Murray, which has drawn international attention due to Jackson's star power, has not been easy for Chernoff or for his firm. "We've handled lots of high-profile cases. It's one thing when you have three cameras out there as you leave the courthouse. It is another when it's 300," Chernoff says.

Chernoff and partner Bill Stradley say Murray's defense has taxed their firm's time and resources; forced them to figure out how best to handle the deluge of media inquiries; and required major case-juggling among the five lawyers at the firm.

"We are a small firm. We tend to share everything — caseloads and revenues," Stradley says. "The complexity and travel requirements of this case, all of those things have been a significant investment. Having one partner focused primarily on this case, we have had to adjust on a weekly basis how to distribute the workload."


Jokes Stradley, "I'm not playing nearly as much golf as I used to, but I used to play a lot, and that's OK, because we all recognize that this is important."

The notoriety of the case has generated new business for the firm, but not much, Stradley says. "It's not like by virtue of having this case, suddenly you have to fend them off at the door, but clients have a greater comfort level of our ability to deal with significant issues," he notes.

Chernoff says the firm uses its website as the main means to quickly inform the public and press of new information about Murray's case, all in an effort to ensure prospective Los Angeles jurors see and hear correct information. Murray has even posted a video on YouTube — which was taped at Chernoff's residence — to let his patients know he's OK and grateful for their concern.

Murray hired Chernoff within 48 hours of Jackson's death. [See "Best Course of Treatment," Texas Lawyer, July 20, 2009, page 5.] Since then, Chernoff has been shuttling from Houston to Los Angeles on a regular basis. Chernoff says last fall he leased an apartment in Hollywood to reduce hotel costs and he learned to stop answering his cell phone when he didn't recognize the number.

Chernoff says in July he even took and passed the California bar exam — although he still has to be sworn in as a member. Four weeks before the test, he began getting up at 3 a.m. to study using 3-year-old books he bought on CraigsList.
 :mrgreen:  
He says he lucked out on the bar exam, because two of the essay questions were about criminal law. He says he took the California bar exam because he didn't want to risk losing his pro hac vice status.

Chernoff says in December 2009 he interviewed about a dozen lawyers but decided on J. Michael Flanagan, a partner in Glendale, Calif.'s Flanagan, Unger & Grover. Chernoff says he chose Flanagan because Flanagan successfully defended two California nurses charged with involuntary manslaughter for allegedly administering Propofol to a patient who died.

Despite the challenges of Murray's case, Chernoff says he can't complain. "I promised him I wouldn't abandon him," he says of Murray. "And we get paid well for what we do, by any standard." Chernoff adds, "I'm not positioned in life that I could afford to do this for free."

Some Strategy

Only the prosecution presented evidence at the hearing, because the defense chose only to cross-examine prosecution witnesses rather than put on an affirmative defense. And the prosecution won.

"Michael is not here with us today because of the actions of an utterly inept, incompetent, reckless doctor, the defendant, Conrad Murray," Deputy District Attorney David Walgren told the court on Jan. 11. In summing up the evidence presented at the hearing, Walgren said that the prosecution's witnesses testified that Murray had spent time hiding evidence "at the time his attention should be on his patient," and failed to tell a paramedic about the Propofol in Jackson's system — all of which reflects on Murray's "consciousness of guilt."

Walgren also noted that records showed Murray had been reading and sending e-mails after he found Jackson not breathing, according to a timeline the doctor gave police. "What you also have to assume then is Dr. Murray allowed Michael Jackson, allowed him to lay dead or dying an hour before 911 is called. . . . Now, if he is accurate and he waited an hour, or if he is lying about the time line, we have those two options. The third option can only be, and it is equally troubling, Dr. Murray is absolutely so utterly incompetent and reckless and inept that he has no idea what time he gave the medicine to Michael Jackson. He has no idea what he gave him or when," Walgren argued.

The defense countered Walgren's arguments by noting that no witnesses said an e-mail killed Jackson, nor did any suggest resuscitation or an earlier call to 911 would have altered his death. Murray's lawyers also noted that Murray was under stress the day Jackson died and he might have been mistaken about the timeline.

On Jan. 11, Pastor ruled there was sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial. California v. Conrad Robert Murray is scheduled to begin March 28.

Chernoff says he and Flanagan had no doubts the judge would rule there was sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial, so they didn't waste their time with affirmative defenses at the hearing. They also didn't want to give prosecutors a preview of their trial strategy.

As part of that strategy, Chernoff says he decided not to waive his client's right to a speedy trial. Without the waiver, California law requires prosecutors to begin presenting their case within 60 days of Murray's Jan. 25 arraignment.

Two chief factors contributed to the defense lawyers' decision to go to trial sooner rather than later, Chernoff and Flanagan say. For example, on Jan. 11, the last day of the six-day preliminary hearing , Pastor suspended Murray's license to practice medicine in California pending the outcome of his trial. Chernoff says he wants Murray's trial to start quickly before additional authorities have a chance to strip the doctor of his Texas and Nevada medical licenses.

A loss of his Texas license would diminish Murray's income and his ability to pay for his defense, not to mention affect the well-being of the doctor's patients and Murray's sense of purpose.

Flanagan says another reason for a speedy trial has to do with the testimony presented by the 24 witnesses prosecutors called at the preliminary hearing — testimony he says "went in opposite directions," which will help the defense raise reasonable doubt at trial. A speedy trial gives the prosecution less time to fix the problems with their case, Flanagan says.

During the hearing, Flanagan says the prosecution changed its theories about what took place in Jackson's home — specifically regarding the Propofol. According to a transcript of the hearing, in his opening statement Walgren talked about Murray "slowly infusing Michael with an injection of Propofol."

But Flanagan elicited testimony showing Jackson could have ingested the Propofol himself. During Flanagan's cross-examination of prosecution witness Dr. Richard Ruffalo, Ruffalo conceded he had mistaken "micrograms" for "milligrams" when measuring concentrations of Jackson's stomach contents from the coroner's toxicologist's report. "I didn't have my glasses on well," Ruffalo testified. Ruffalo also said that properly re-calculated numbers may lead to the conclusion that Jackson "self-ingested" or "drank" some of the Propofol as opposed to Murray administering all of the drug to Jackson. However, Ruffalo testified that Murray was still responsible for leaving the drug unattended in Jackson's presence.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office declines comment for this article. "We have a pending case and it would be inappropriate for us to engage in the type of out-of-court discussion that you are seeking," writes spokeswoman Sandi Gibbons.

Given how closely he has become identified with Murray's case, Chernoff knows the stakes. "If I walk out with my client at the end of the trial, it's going to have a tremendous impact on my practice. If I don't walk out[with him], I'm going to be the guy who lost the biggest trial since O.J. Simpson's."


Related stories:
[links]
* "Expert: Prosecution of Michael Jackson's Doctor Will Be Difficult"
* "Best Course of Treatment: Representing Michael Jackson's Personal M.D."
* "Houston lawyers at California hearing for Conrad Murray, one of King of Pop Michael Jackson's doctors "
* "Houston lawyer representing Michael Jackson's physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, at preliminary hearing today"
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Guest

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Quote from: "Sinderella"
Haha,Hollywood and broke....
Yes, California is THE most expensive state in America, very expensive!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Online ~Souza~

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I am going to send Mr. Chernoff an email to see if he is as blabby as Craigh Harvey. Anyone who has questions for him?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline fordtocarr

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Soooo, what are you saying about the hoax then if you don't think the court is part of the hoax???


Quote from: "RunFaYaLife"
Ed Chernoff is a Texas Lawyer.
http://www.houstoncriminallaw.com/CM/At ... rnoff.html

Not buying the the hoax staged thing ....those are pictures of his family in the background. As far as skeleton's go and skulls for that matter...
Hey I like them too!
Does the skull necklace and ring I wear make me part of the death hoax?
 :idea:  :?:  :roll:
http://www.law.com/jsp/tx/PubArticleTX. ... hbxlogin=1

Quote
"You have been waiting all week to say that," Chernoff, a partner in Houston's Stradley Chernoff & Alford, recalls telling the judge.

The Jan. 7 exchange stands out as a rare moment of levity for Chernoff during the 18 stressful months he has represented Murray, a Houston-based cardiologist. On Feb. 8, 2010, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office charged Murray with involuntary manslaughter in connection with the June 25, 2009, death of Jackson from a lethal dose of Propofol.

The DA's office alleges Murray "did unlawfully, and without malice, kill Michael Joseph Jackson . . . in the commission of an unlawful act, not amounting to a felony; and in the commission of a lawful act which might have produced death, in an unlawful manner, and without due caution and circumspection."

After the conclusion of the preliminary hearing, Pastor ruled on Jan. 11 that there is sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial. Murray pleaded not guilty at his Jan. 25 arraignment.

The representation of Murray, which has drawn international attention due to Jackson's star power, has not been easy for Chernoff or for his firm. "We've handled lots of high-profile cases. It's one thing when you have three cameras out there as you leave the courthouse. It is another when it's 300," Chernoff says.

Chernoff and partner Bill Stradley say Murray's defense has taxed their firm's time and resources; forced them to figure out how best to handle the deluge of media inquiries; and required major case-juggling among the five lawyers at the firm.

"We are a small firm. We tend to share everything — caseloads and revenues," Stradley says. "The complexity and travel requirements of this case, all of those things have been a significant investment. Having one partner focused primarily on this case, we have had to adjust on a weekly basis how to distribute the workload."


Jokes Stradley, "I'm not playing nearly as much golf as I used to, but I used to play a lot, and that's OK, because we all recognize that this is important."

The notoriety of the case has generated new business for the firm, but not much, Stradley says. "It's not like by virtue of having this case, suddenly you have to fend them off at the door, but clients have a greater comfort level of our ability to deal with significant issues," he notes.

Chernoff says the firm uses its website as the main means to quickly inform the public and press of new information about Murray's case, all in an effort to ensure prospective Los Angeles jurors see and hear correct information. Murray has even posted a video on YouTube — which was taped at Chernoff's residence — to let his patients know he's OK and grateful for their concern.

Murray hired Chernoff within 48 hours of Jackson's death. [See "Best Course of Treatment," Texas Lawyer, July 20, 2009, page 5.] Since then, Chernoff has been shuttling from Houston to Los Angeles on a regular basis. Chernoff says last fall he leased an apartment in Hollywood to reduce hotel costs and he learned to stop answering his cell phone when he didn't recognize the number.

Chernoff says in July he even took and passed the California bar exam — although he still has to be sworn in as a member. Four weeks before the test, he began getting up at 3 a.m. to study using 3-year-old books he bought on CraigsList.
 :mrgreen:  
He says he lucked out on the bar exam, because two of the essay questions were about criminal law. He says he took the California bar exam because he didn't want to risk losing his pro hac vice status.

Chernoff says in December 2009 he interviewed about a dozen lawyers but decided on J. Michael Flanagan, a partner in Glendale, Calif.'s Flanagan, Unger & Grover. Chernoff says he chose Flanagan because Flanagan successfully defended two California nurses charged with involuntary manslaughter for allegedly administering Propofol to a patient who died.

Despite the challenges of Murray's case, Chernoff says he can't complain. "I promised him I wouldn't abandon him," he says of Murray. "And we get paid well for what we do, by any standard." Chernoff adds, "I'm not positioned in life that I could afford to do this for free."

Some Strategy

Only the prosecution presented evidence at the hearing, because the defense chose only to cross-examine prosecution witnesses rather than put on an affirmative defense. And the prosecution won.

"Michael is not here with us today because of the actions of an utterly inept, incompetent, reckless doctor, the defendant, Conrad Murray," Deputy District Attorney David Walgren told the court on Jan. 11. In summing up the evidence presented at the hearing, Walgren said that the prosecution's witnesses testified that Murray had spent time hiding evidence "at the time his attention should be on his patient," and failed to tell a paramedic about the Propofol in Jackson's system — all of which reflects on Murray's "consciousness of guilt."

Walgren also noted that records showed Murray had been reading and sending e-mails after he found Jackson not breathing, according to a timeline the doctor gave police. "What you also have to assume then is Dr. Murray allowed Michael Jackson, allowed him to lay dead or dying an hour before 911 is called. . . . Now, if he is accurate and he waited an hour, or if he is lying about the time line, we have those two options. The third option can only be, and it is equally troubling, Dr. Murray is absolutely so utterly incompetent and reckless and inept that he has no idea what time he gave the medicine to Michael Jackson. He has no idea what he gave him or when," Walgren argued.

The defense countered Walgren's arguments by noting that no witnesses said an e-mail killed Jackson, nor did any suggest resuscitation or an earlier call to 911 would have altered his death. Murray's lawyers also noted that Murray was under stress the day Jackson died and he might have been mistaken about the timeline.

On Jan. 11, Pastor ruled there was sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial. California v. Conrad Robert Murray is scheduled to begin March 28.

Chernoff says he and Flanagan had no doubts the judge would rule there was sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial, so they didn't waste their time with affirmative defenses at the hearing. They also didn't want to give prosecutors a preview of their trial strategy.

As part of that strategy, Chernoff says he decided not to waive his client's right to a speedy trial. Without the waiver, California law requires prosecutors to begin presenting their case within 60 days of Murray's Jan. 25 arraignment.

Two chief factors contributed to the defense lawyers' decision to go to trial sooner rather than later, Chernoff and Flanagan say. For example, on Jan. 11, the last day of the six-day preliminary hearing , Pastor suspended Murray's license to practice medicine in California pending the outcome of his trial. Chernoff says he wants Murray's trial to start quickly before additional authorities have a chance to strip the doctor of his Texas and Nevada medical licenses.

A loss of his Texas license would diminish Murray's income and his ability to pay for his defense, not to mention affect the well-being of the doctor's patients and Murray's sense of purpose.

Flanagan says another reason for a speedy trial has to do with the testimony presented by the 24 witnesses prosecutors called at the preliminary hearing — testimony he says "went in opposite directions," which will help the defense raise reasonable doubt at trial. A speedy trial gives the prosecution less time to fix the problems with their case, Flanagan says.

During the hearing, Flanagan says the prosecution changed its theories about what took place in Jackson's home — specifically regarding the Propofol. According to a transcript of the hearing, in his opening statement Walgren talked about Murray "slowly infusing Michael with an injection of Propofol."

But Flanagan elicited testimony showing Jackson could have ingested the Propofol himself. During Flanagan's cross-examination of prosecution witness Dr. Richard Ruffalo, Ruffalo conceded he had mistaken "micrograms" for "milligrams" when measuring concentrations of Jackson's stomach contents from the coroner's toxicologist's report. "I didn't have my glasses on well," Ruffalo testified. Ruffalo also said that properly re-calculated numbers may lead to the conclusion that Jackson "self-ingested" or "drank" some of the Propofol as opposed to Murray administering all of the drug to Jackson. However, Ruffalo testified that Murray was still responsible for leaving the drug unattended in Jackson's presence.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office declines comment for this article. "We have a pending case and it would be inappropriate for us to engage in the type of out-of-court discussion that you are seeking," writes spokeswoman Sandi Gibbons.

Given how closely he has become identified with Murray's case, Chernoff knows the stakes. "If I walk out with my client at the end of the trial, it's going to have a tremendous impact on my practice. If I don't walk out[with him], I'm going to be the guy who lost the biggest trial since O.J. Simpson's."


Related stories:
[links]
* "Expert: Prosecution of Michael Jackson's Doctor Will Be Difficult"
* "Best Course of Treatment: Representing Michael Jackson's Personal M.D."
* "Houston lawyers at California hearing for Conrad Murray, one of King of Pop Michael Jackson's doctors "
* "Houston lawyer representing Michael Jackson's physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, at preliminary hearing today"
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

RunFaYaLife

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Quote
Soooo, what are you saying about the hoax then if you don't think the court is part of the hoax???

I'm saying that the court being part of the hoax is ridiculous.

It isn't cheap to have a real court trial much less a pretend one.

Not only that but the state of California is broke as a joke...
they have already tried or did hit MJ's estate up for reimbursement
for all of the cops they provided for his 'fake" funeral.

It makes about as much sense as the hospital being in on it and the
ambulance service.
The ONLY way that would happen is if Mike bought an ambulance...
a helicopter and a hospital.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

RunFaYaLife

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Mebbe the TII film they made was the hoax death instead of what was marketed.
In the real world that is the ONLY way any of it would make sense to me.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

RunFaYaLife

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Quote
I am going to send Mr. Chernoff an email to see if he is as blabby as Craigh Harvey. Anyone who has questions for him?

Souza
Ask him something relating to the trail ...like do you have the autopsy pictures?
Does the report differ from what was made public?
Or something he cannot really talk about and see what happens.... lol
That'll test him.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline MissG

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My question is if Murray and him got the ties in a wholesale lot.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
("Minkin güerveeeee")
Michael pls come back


"Why a four-year-old child could understand this hoax. Run out and find me a four-year-old child. I can't make head nor tail out of it"

Offline trustno1

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:lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:
Good one!  Again!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
In a world filled with despair, we must still dare to dream.  And in a world filled with distrust, we must still dare to believe.

Offline everlastinglove_MJ

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Quote from: "Sarahli"
I notice the comparisons between Texas and California judicial system Mr. Chernoff makes... more independant in Texas rather than in Cali... and the skeleton is really in the screen on purpose  :lol:  but why?

Yes, it is striking that Mr. Chernoff is comparing the California and the Texas judicial system. Why? He mentions the system in Texas is more independant. What is he actually sayin'? Would it be in Murray's favor to have a trial in Texas?

In the article of law.com I don't see anything written about the comparison :?  It seems like the video is an attachment of the next article:


Houston Meets Hollywood: Ed Chernoff Prepares for High-Stakes Defense of Dr. Conrad MurrayMiriam Rozen

Texas Lawyer
January 31, 2011

Ed Chernoff, a partner in Houston's Stradley Chernoff & Alford
Image: John Everett
 
Houston-based cardiologist Conrad Murray
At a preliminary hearing in the criminal case against Michael Jackson's doctor, Conrad Murray, lawyer Ed Chernoff had a ready response when Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor expressed his concern over Chernoff's cross-examination of a police detective by saying, "Houston, we have a problem. . . ."

"You have been waiting all week to say that," Chernoff, a partner in Houston's Stradley Chernoff & Alford, recalls telling the judge.

The Jan. 7 exchange stands out as a rare moment of levity for Chernoff during the 18 stressful months he has represented Murray, a Houston-based cardiologist. On Feb. 8, 2010, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office charged Murray with involuntary manslaughter in connection with the June 25, 2009, death of Jackson from a lethal dose of Propofol.

The DA's office alleges Murray "did unlawfully, and without malice, kill Michael Joseph Jackson . . . in the commission of an unlawful act, not amounting to a felony; and in the commission of a lawful act which might have produced death, in an unlawful manner, and without due caution and circumspection."

After the conclusion of the preliminary hearing, Pastor ruled on Jan. 11 that there is sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial. Murray pleaded not guilty at his Jan. 25 arraignment.

The representation of Murray, which has drawn international attention due to Jackson's star power, has not been easy for Chernoff or for his firm. "We've handled lots of high-profile cases. It's one thing when you have three cameras out there as you leave the courthouse. It is another when it's 300," Chernoff says.

Chernoff and partner Bill Stradley say Murray's defense has taxed their firm's time and resources; forced them to figure out how best to handle the deluge of media inquiries; and required major case-juggling among the five lawyers at the firm.

"We are a small firm. We tend to share everything — caseloads and revenues," Stradley says. "The complexity and travel requirements of this case, all of those things have been a significant investment. Having one partner focused primarily on this case, we have had to adjust on a weekly basis how to distribute the workload."

Jokes Stradley, "I'm not playing nearly as much golf as I used to, but I used to play a lot, and that's OK, because we all recognize that this is important."

The notoriety of the case has generated new business for the firm, but not much, Stradley says. "It's not like by virtue of having this case, suddenly you have to fend them off at the door, but clients have a greater comfort level of our ability to deal with significant issues," he notes.

Chernoff says the firm uses its website as the main means to quickly inform the public and press of new information about Murray's case, all in an effort to ensure prospective Los Angeles jurors see and hear correct information. Murray has even posted a video on YouTube — which was taped at Chernoff's residence — to let his patients know he's OK and grateful for their concern.

Murray hired Chernoff within 48 hours of Jackson's death. [See "Best Course of Treatment," Texas Lawyer, July 20, 2009, page 5.] Since then, Chernoff has been shuttling from Houston to Los Angeles on a regular basis. Chernoff says last fall he leased an apartment in Hollywood to reduce hotel costs and he learned to stop answering his cell phone when he didn't recognize the number.

Chernoff says in July he even took and passed the California bar exam — although he still has to be sworn in as a member. Four weeks before the test, he began getting up at 3 a.m. to study using 3-year-old books he bought on CraigsList. He says he lucked out on the bar exam, because two of the essay questions were about criminal law. He says he took the California bar exam because he didn't want to risk losing his pro hac vice status.

 
Video: Chernoff Discusses Murray Representation

Chernoff says in December 2009 he interviewed about a dozen lawyers but decided on J. Michael Flanagan, a partner in Glendale, Calif.'s Flanagan, Unger & Grover. Chernoff says he chose Flanagan because Flanagan successfully defended two California nurses charged with involuntary manslaughter for allegedly administering Propofol to a patient who died.

Despite the challenges of Murray's case, Chernoff says he can't complain. "I promised him I wouldn't abandon him," he says of Murray. "And we get paid well for what we do, by any standard." Chernoff adds, "I'm not positioned in life that I could afford to do this for free."

Some Strategy
Only the prosecution presented evidence at the hearing, because the defense chose only to cross-examine prosecution witnesses rather than put on an affirmative defense. And the prosecution won.

"Michael is not here with us today because of the actions of an utterly inept, incompetent, reckless doctor, the defendant, Conrad Murray," Deputy District Attorney David Walgren told the court on Jan. 11. In summing up the evidence presented at the hearing, Walgren said that the prosecution's witnesses testified that Murray had spent time hiding evidence "at the time his attention should be on his patient," and failed to tell a paramedic about the Propofol in Jackson's system — all of which reflects on Murray's "consciousness of guilt."

Walgren also noted that records showed Murray had been reading and sending e-mails after he found Jackson not breathing, according to a timeline the doctor gave police. "What you also have to assume then is Dr. Murray allowed Michael Jackson, allowed him to lay dead or dying an hour before 911 is called. . . . Now, if he is accurate and he waited an hour, or if he is lying about the time line, we have those two options. The third option can only be, and it is equally troubling, Dr. Murray is absolutely so utterly incompetent and reckless and inept that he has no idea what time he gave the medicine to Michael Jackson. He has no idea what he gave him or when," Walgren argued.

The defense countered Walgren's arguments by noting that no witnesses said an e-mail killed Jackson, nor did any suggest resuscitation or an earlier call to 911 would have altered his death. Murray's lawyers also noted that Murray was under stress the day Jackson died and he might have been mistaken about the timeline.

On Jan. 11, Pastor ruled there was sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial. California v. Conrad Robert Murray is scheduled to begin March 28.

Chernoff says he and Flanagan had no doubts the judge would rule there was sufficient evidence for the prosecution's case against Murray to proceed to trial, so they didn't waste their time with affirmative defenses at the hearing. They also didn't want to give prosecutors a preview of their trial strategy.

As part of that strategy, Chernoff says he decided not to waive his client's right to a speedy trial. Without the waiver, California law requires prosecutors to begin presenting their case within 60 days of Murray's Jan. 25 arraignment.

Two chief factors contributed to the defense lawyers' decision to go to trial sooner rather than later, Chernoff and Flanagan say. For example, on Jan. 11, the last day of the six-day preliminary hearing , Pastor suspended Murray's license to practice medicine in California pending the outcome of his trial. Chernoff says he wants Murray's trial to start quickly before additional authorities have a chance to strip the doctor of his Texas and Nevada medical licenses.

A loss of his Texas license would diminish Murray's income and his ability to pay for his defense, not to mention affect the well-being of the doctor's patients and Murray's sense of purpose.

Flanagan says another reason for a speedy trial has to do with the testimony presented by the 24 witnesses prosecutors called at the preliminary hearing — testimony he says "went in opposite directions," which will help the defense raise reasonable doubt at trial. A speedy trial gives the prosecution less time to fix the problems with their case, Flanagan says.

During the hearing, Flanagan says the prosecution changed its theories about what took place in Jackson's home — specifically regarding the Propofol. According to a transcript of the hearing, in his opening statement Walgren talked about Murray "slowly infusing Michael with an injection of Propofol."

But Flanagan elicited testimony showing Jackson could have ingested the Propofol himself. During Flanagan's cross-examination of prosecution witness Dr. Richard Ruffalo, Ruffalo conceded he had mistaken "micrograms" for "milligrams" when measuring concentrations of Jackson's stomach contents from the coroner's toxicologist's report. "I didn't have my glasses on well," Ruffalo testified. Ruffalo also said that properly re-calculated numbers may lead to the conclusion that Jackson "self-ingested" or "drank" some of the Propofol as opposed to Murray administering all of the drug to Jackson. However, Ruffalo testified that Murray was still responsible for leaving the drug unattended in Jackson's presence.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office declines comment for this article. "We have a pending case and it would be inappropriate for us to engage in the type of out-of-court discussion that you are seeking," writes spokeswoman Sandi Gibbons.

Given how closely he has become identified with Murray's case, Chernoff knows the stakes. "If I walk out with my client at the end of the trial, it's going to have a tremendous impact on my practice. If I don't walk out[with him], I'm going to be the guy who lost the biggest trial since O.J. Simpson's."
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It's all for L.O.V.E.

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Quote from: "imred"
Quote from: "Sinderella"
Haha,Hollywood and broke....
Yes, California is THE most expensive state in America, very expensive!

Yup it's actually said that you pay high prices for the sun and beaches :)
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