Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

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Offline everlastinglove_MJ

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Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 18, 2011, 05:57:33 PM
17 February 2011
Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip
 
Protests have been banned in Bahrain and the military has been ordered to tighten its grip after the violent removal of anti-government demonstrators, state TV reports.

The army would take every measure necessary to preserve security, the interior ministry said.

Three people died and 231 were injured when police broke up the main protest camp, said Bahrain's health minister.

The unrest comes amid a wave of protest in the Middle East and North Africa.

Bahrain's demonstrators want wide-ranging political reforms and had been camped out in the capital, Manama, since Tuesday.

Tanks and checkpoints
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton expressed Washington's "deep concern" in a call to the Bahraini foreign minister on Thursday.

Mrs Clinton "urged restraint moving forward. They discussed political and economic reform efforts to respond to the citizens of Bahrain," a state department official told the BBC.

Police action was necessary to pull Bahrain back from the "brink of a sectarian abyss", Bahraini Foreign Minister Khaled bin Ahmed al-Khalifa said on Thursday.

Bahrain's Shia Muslim majority has been ruled by a Sunni Muslim royal family since the 18th Century.

The announcement on state television said the army had taken control of "key parts" of the city.

Tanks, army patrols and military checkpoints are out on key streets, with helicopters deployed overhead.

Barbed wire has been erected on roads leading to the main protest area, Pearl Square, and the interior ministry has warned people to stay off the streets.

Protesters and opposition politicians expressed outrage at the violence of the crackdown.

A leader of the main minority Shia opposition, Abdul Jalil Khalil, said 18 MPs were resigning in protest.

Ibrahim Sharif, of Bahrain's secular Waad party, told the BBC the protests would continue.

"We are going to do what's necessary to change this into a democratic country, even if some of us lose our lives," he said.

"We want a proper, functioning, constitutional democracy."

Mr Sharif said the riot police had moved into Pearl Square at about 0300 (0000 GMT) as people were sleeping.
 
Hundreds of protesters were injured Bahrain's authorities defended their actions. Finance Minister Sheikh Ahmed Bin Mohammed Al Khalifa told the BBC up to 70 police officers had been hurt.

"When (the police) first went in, they went in without any intention to harm anybody, just to move the people who were occupying the roundabout and blocking traffic," Sheikh Al Khalifa said.

"Some of those people left but some of those people came back and fought."

He added: "I think restraint is being used."

But many protesters said there had been no warning about the raid.

On Thursday morning there were angry scenes outside Manama's main hospital, Salmaniya, as hundreds of people gathered, some answering calls to donate blood and others defacing images of the Bahraini royal family.

'Exercise restraint'
 
The crackdown has caused unease in the West. Bahrain is a key UK and US ally and hosts the US Navy's Fifth Fleet.

UK Foreign Secretary William Hague condemned the violent clashes, calling on Bahrain's government to "exercise restraint".

Britain has also said it will review its licences for arms exports to Bahrain. The UK has sold tear gas and riot control equipment to Bahrain, but the Foreign Offices says these licences will be revoked if it is found those arms were used to facilitate internal repression.

Foreign ministers of the Gulf Cooperation Council, which includes Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates, are to hold an extraordinary meeting in Bahrain on Thursday.

Bahrain's foreign ministry said council members were "expected to announce their support for the [Bahraini] government in security, defence and politically".

Since independence from the UK in 1971, tensions between the Sunni elite and the less affluent Shia have frequently caused civil unrest. Shia groups say they are marginalised, subject to unfair laws, and repressed.

The conflict lessened in 1999 when Sheikh Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa became emir. He began a cautious process of democratic reform. In 2002, he proclaimed himself king and landmark elections were held.

But the opposition boycotted the polls because the appointed upper chamber of parliament was given equal powers to the elected lower chamber.

At the scene
Ian Pannell,
 
BBC News, Manama
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There were columns of tanks and armoured personnel carriers moving through the city this morning. The area around Pearl Square, which was the home of the protesters up until 12 to 15 hours ago, is now ringfenced by the security forces.

Barbed wire has been erected; there are vehicle checkpoints and roadblocks around the city, traffic is being controlled, and the authorities have said all protests have been banned.

It was a very different scene at the hospital: one of passion, chaos, mourning - and anger. Hundreds of people were gathered outside as the ambulances turned up. Crowds rushed forward; doctors were angry because they said ambulances had been prevented from attending to those people who had been injured when the police attacked them.

On the wards, we saw a ledger of those who had been admitted: there were more than 300 names at that point. In the morgue, there were three people who had been killed, all with very clear evidence that live rounds had been used on them.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12495733

Again a fight for freedom and democracy, which I completely support, though I'm worried because three people have been killed yesterday, a fourth today, many injured and many protesters are missing. It's sickening to read that some protesters were shot dead by the police without warning. Shouldn't we all (the world) join the protests against the surpressing authorities in Bahrain. I know, that's not realistic, I'm afraid it's very complicated, but that's how I feel right now. I deeply wish strength and faith for the people in Bahrain and others who fight for freedom.

''The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.''


Maya Angelou (b. 1928), U.S. author. Caged Bird, Shaker, Why Don't You Sing? (1983).
« Last Edit: February 18, 2011, 06:07:31 PM by everlastinglove_MJ »
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 18, 2011, 06:05:22 PM
God, I really hope this tide will turn. They should not give up, who the fuck thinks they can kill someone for demanding freedom?
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 18, 2011, 06:36:05 PM
Quote from: "~Souza~"
God, I really hope this tide will turn. They should not give up, who the fuck thinks they can kill someone for demanding freedom?

the ones who think they got the power :x

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 18, 2011, 08:51:27 PM
A little history on the geopolitics of the Persian Gulf
By: Lorenzo Angiolillo F.

The Carter era deployed warships in the Gulf and compact that forces Americans could do use periodically Bahrain, military bases in Diego Garcia (an island under British control in the Ocean Indian), as well as in Oman and Saudi Arabia. All these bases were employed between 1990 y1991 during the Gulf war, and are using today.

The State of Bahrain, ancient Saar, belongs to the Asian continent its strategic position in the Persian Gulf has done was controlled and influenced by the Assyrians, Babylonians, Greeks, Persians and the Arabs, in which the island became Islamic. Bahrain was known in ancient times as Dilmun, Tylos (name given by the Greeks), Awal and Mishmahig when it was part of the Persian Empire. In 1977 United States evacuated the naval base of al - Jufayr. The Iranian revolution had an impact on the country in the 1980s due to the effect that produced a Sunni power on a mainly Shiite population as a consequence of this fact, in 1981 establishing the clandestine front for national liberation. In 1999 Emir Isa bin Sulman Al Khalifa dies and his son Hamad bin Isa Al-Khalifa inherits the throne. 2002 The Emir assumes the throne as King. Bahrain is a hereditary monarchy under the leadership of Al-Khalifa family. The King is head of State and Prime Minister is head of Government. Both positions are occupied by members of the Al-Khalifa family. During the war of Iraq V fleet carriers and United States command Central Naval (NAVCENT) operated from Manama and Al - Jufayr in full swing. The full cooperation of Bahrain with United States in the military field made that pleased White House, 14 March 2002 have select condition who until then had only Egypt and Jordan among Arab countries (then Bahrain was the first monarchy of the Gulf in obtaining it) to Bahrain of the status of Principal ally and nothing more than eight States around the world, which allows access to surplus of NATO armaments remittances and tendering of contracts of the U.S. armed forces. Live primarily oil, although it has large reserves of Gas.


Island Diego Garcia is a coral atoll of approximately 40 km², the largest in a group of 52 islands comprising the Chagos Archipelago, located in the Indian Ocean was discovered at the beginning of the 16th century, by a Portuguese expedition in 1554, the marine is Spanish Diego García de Moguer discovered the Chagos Archipelago named largest island with its name, Diego Garcia. EE.UU. requested in 1966 to United Kingdom authorization to use military assignment is for 50 years until 2016. (Already are asking for renewal for 50 years more). Its native residents were expelled by Great Britain to clear the field to an American military base. Two conditions were required by the Americans: Island was completely emptied of its inhabitants and eluded the British evacuate them. Between 1967 and 1973 "ilois" (as they are referred to as the "diegogarcianos") were systematically expelled from their homes. The diegogarcianos people expelled from their territories in the 20th century. At the end of 2000, in a lawsuit initiated by the expelled, the European Court of human rights and the London High Court he found had been "shamefully treated" and they had the right to return to the island, but he recognized the military character that prevents civilians, settlement and a sarcastic English government excuses is that according to their studies that island will be flooded by climate change, "apparently" the gringos think otherwise. Now there there a large naval base that controls the Near East and South Asia. Diego Garcia was the only American naval base launched air offensive operations during operation "Desert Storm" and is considered to be vital in the defensive structure of the United States. Diego Garcia was used as a clandestine detention center "cesspool" of the C.I.A since 2001 as he could know... Why all the bases have its objective

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 01:53:00 AM
Quote
God, I really hope this tide will turn. They should not give up, who the fuck thinks they can kill someone for demanding freedom?

DiTTo that!

Interesting developments in the middle east.
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Offline mjfansince4

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 03:01:39 AM
2011 seems to be the year for revolution, freedom and take overs.
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 10:02:33 AM
Im not sure violent protests are the way forward and i dont think they should be encouraged.

I find it disturbing that Egypt is now being used as a blueprint for "change"

What if this is the NWO plan??  bring chaos and unrest to the World???

I am sure my view will not be shared by many....

But the pen is mightier than the sword.

Violent protests are not the answer.

This will only bring more death and pain.
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 01:06:56 PM
I agree .... so the ruling elites have decided some time ago Affects us all ... the strategy is for all people.
Even in Italy ... the media are converging attention on the behavior of the Prime Minister, for  the crimes of extortion and prostitution of minors.
This is  very serious, sure, but the media  divert people's attention from more serious events : the goal is to exaggerate  the popular reactions to this facts so  to being asked  a government "strong and authoritarian "....
light the fuse of the disorder popular in Arab countries.
It 's a clear strategy  of  fire for the Mediterranean  and    overturn  the governments.
This is not for Freedom of the people but to tighten their living conditions and to
force them  then, with false promises, to  a government even more authoritarian and
gradually up to the New World Order.
For all us...Affects us all ... the strategy is for all people.
Even in Italy ... the media are converging attention on the behavior of the Prime Minister, for  the crimes of extortion and prostitution of minors.
A premier who has combined sorts of things, accused for serious offenses and proscribed terms, is investigated and processed in record time for an alleged sexual offense. How can we ever think that a state apparatus such as the judiciary, always ready to protect the interests of power  suddenly is  free to prosecute what appears today as the most powerful man in Italy?
This is  very serious, sure, but the media  divert people's attention from more serious events : the object is to cause the popular reactions to this facts so  to being asked  a government "strong and authoritarian "....... to restore honesty and cleanliness :roll:
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 03:23:17 PM
Quote from: "DancingTheDream"
Im not sure violent protests are the way forward and i dont think they should be encouraged.

I find it disturbing that Egypt is now being used as a blueprint for "change"

What if this is the NWO plan??  bring chaos and unrest to the World???

I am sure my view will not be shared by many....

But the pen is mightier than the sword.

Violent protests are not the answer.

This will only bring more death and pain.

As far as I know the government turned this into a violent demonstration and not the demonstrators. I think people are opening their eyes. Tunesia was the first to show the world that if you feel like your freedom has been taken away, that you have the power to get it back if you unite. I hope they will continue to fight for their freedom. I don't like the violence, but if that is what they have to face to get their freedom back, then all I hope is that it won't be in vain. Point is that they need to stay awake after they succeed, because taking down the government is only the beginning. Building up your country and making it work is the next step. And always stay alert so that they can't trick you anymore.

I heard there were demonstrations in Spain too, did anyone hear something about that?
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Offline DancingTheDream

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 03:24:10 PM
If the protesters are not being violent...  then how did police officers become hurt?
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 03:29:01 PM
Quote from: "DancingTheDream"
If the protesters are not being violent...  then how did police officers become hurt?
Self defence?
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Offline DancingTheDream

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 03:51:57 PM
Quote from: "~Souza~"
Quote from: "DancingTheDream"
If the protesters are not being violent...  then how did police officers become hurt?
Self defence?

We have to be careful here.   Police officers are people doing their jobs.   I find it interesting, police officers are becoming a legitimate target in all of this and are always painted as the bad guys and the instigator in violence.

It could equally be argued that the injuries that were sustained by protesters were caused by police officers acting in self defence.

This is part of my argument as to why these protests should not be encouraged.  We are pitting people against people....    whilst the ones who are required to stand up and answer are protected in their ivory towers.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2011, 03:55:38 PM by DancingTheDream »

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 03:55:03 PM
Quote from: "DancingTheDream"
Quote from: "~Souza~"
Quote from: "DancingTheDream"
If the protesters are not being violent...  then how did police officers become hurt?
Self defence?

We have to be careful here.   Police officers are people doing their jobs.   I find it interesting, police officers are becoming a legitimate target in all of this and are always painted as the bad guys and the instigator in violence.

It could equally be argued that the injuries that were sustained by protesters were caused by police officers acting in self defence.
They follow up orders from the government to stop protesters, even with violence if needed. They should have looked at the army in Egypt, who only made sure that it didn't get out of hand, but let the people peacefully demonstrate.
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Offline DancingTheDream

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 04:06:26 PM
Quote from: "~Souza~"
They follow up orders from the government to stop protesters, even with violence if needed. They should have looked at the army in Egypt, who only made sure that it didn't get out of hand, but let the people peacefully demonstrate.

I guess it depends on the country you are in.

In the UK, the police are "policing by consent".

I know not all police officers (as in all jobs) are good people.  There are bad apples and corruption in all walks of life.

However, a government cannot order to stop protesters in my country.  The police are there to protect the citizens and uphold the law.  No-one can "order" a police officer to make an arrest.  That is up to individual descretion.

The point i am trying to make....

is what if this is what the NWO want??  Pit people against people.  Create chaos and disorder, whilst they sit back and watch it all unfold.    They are not the ones on the street.  They are not the ones faced with a baying mob they have to stop.  Think for one minute what it would be like to be a police officer on the front line faced with that.  They are humans...   people... with families and children themselves.  They are not robots.  
Sometimes i think we really have to stop and think deeper, for a minute.  
It is not ok to be violent and hurt a fellow human being under any circumstances.   You say "self defence".  Like i said..  the police officers can equally use that excuse too.

I feel that the World is being encouraged, at the moment,..  to join in with these protests..   that it is ok to violently protest and injure people and destroy property.  I cannot agree with that.  There are ways and means of protesting.  It doesnt have to be violent.  

This could be part of the plan..  is what i am saying..  create chaos and violence and disorder.  Let it unfold before they can use it as an excuse to rein it all back in.
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Offline everlastinglove_MJ

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 19, 2011, 09:07:16 PM
I keep thinking about the increasing amount of protests in the Middle East. In the news I'm trying to find the cause of all the unrest. It's like a domino track and wondering where the first stone was falling, I suppose Tunesia. May be the tension of being surpressed became too high among the people of Tunesia that it was the last straw. In the news we learned that it started with protests against high unemployment, but it turned out to be protests against the violent police brutality. The goverment condemned the protests as a act of terrorism. Though the government had announced lower figures of people who've been killed according to human right organisations.
The police in Bahrain who's claiming according to the news that they got injured by the protesters. No doubt it was self defence of the protesters.
The media is used as a tool by the government's/authorities, not only in Tunesia, also in Egypt, Bahrain, Yemen etc., to camouflage their flaws and keep a positive reputation towards the rest of the world. That is the power of the government AND the media.We don't know exactly what really happened there, we're dependent on what the media - under consent of the Middle East governments - provides us, which is tricky because we'll see what the governments want us to see.

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Offline Sarahli

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 20, 2011, 04:33:06 PM
The dark side can turn a peaceful demonstration into a violent one. They can infiltrate it with agents provocateurs and hence give an excuse for the police to retaliate and discredit the purpose of the demonstration .... . We never know  :?
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 20, 2011, 05:30:22 PM
All I know is the guy that was responsible for what went down in Cairo was an Egyptian and it was started via the internet...pretty cool.

I think this was bound to happen sooner or later...this could be the sooner OR the later.
Since we are a global society with lots of educated people...a lot which have been or finished their education in the states...then went back to their various countries have seen what we live like or any free country as adversed to a dictatorship.
They are sick of being the worker bee paupers over there and the wealth going to the dictator.

I think this is a good thing.
The next big thing is going to be establishing a different kind of government...
it will not be easy....hope they can do it right.
 
POWER TO THE PEOPLE!
Big sacrifices were and are being made to make this happen.

I figured Bahrain would be mowing them down in the streets more then they did.
That country is disappointing....they are such liar's.
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 20, 2011, 05:34:10 PM
Now what about Mexico?

We have a serious problem right next door...I feel sorry for the residents.
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Offline melody

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 20, 2011, 05:34:55 PM
Quote from: "DancingTheDream"
Im not sure violent protests are the way forward and i dont think they should be encouraged.

I find it disturbing that Egypt is now being used as a blueprint for "change"

What if this is the NWO plan??  bring chaos and unrest to the World???

Coincidentally or not, a video went viral today showing a group of peaceful Bahraini protesters getting shot at by Bahrain's army: http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3WRKoZPPao

Way to discourage any peaceful protesting.
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 20, 2011, 05:44:25 PM
Figures.
The big heads over there will not go quietly.

I read a site where poster's who live in Bahrain post and ...little did I know how
harsh they really are behind their big glass modern curtain...until I read what they had to say.
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 21, 2011, 09:11:45 AM
Looks like it is spreading to Marocco.
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 22, 2011, 04:16:15 PM
Quote from: "DancingTheDream"
Im not sure violent protests are the way forward and i dont think they should be encouraged.

I find it disturbing that Egypt is now being used as a blueprint for "change"

What if this is the NWO plan??  bring chaos and unrest to the World???

I am sure my view will not be shared by many....

But the pen is mightier than the sword.

Violent protests are not the answer.

This will only bring more death and pain.
Who said that the revolution in Egypt was a violent one?!?!? The Egyptian protesters were unarmed and the revolution was a very peaceful one!!! But the government started to shoot them from the top of the houses. The police was shooting the crowds of the protesters and killing them. Children were killed too. It was a real fight on the streets but remember one thing: The protesters normally don't start the violence. It is always the police or the army that tries to kill the people to make them afraid of the government. But the people want their freedom and are fed up with their governments. They want democracy. How is that wish to be fulfilled if the people don't fight for their freedom? When the Egyptian President stepped down the Egyptian people got very happy and they went to the streets ad started to clean all the streets of the city especially the Tahrir Square where all these violent act took place. They were happy for the victory. So cleaning the city was a major sign of their victory and their feelings towards their country!
The first revolution in the Middle East this year was in Tunisia, not in Egypt.
Now in Libya things are getting worse. The government is shooting the crows of protesters with canons!!!!! Watch the news. It's madness!!!!!!! I hope they could succeed to change their government as soon as possible!!!!!![attachment=1:luezofmt]5438689994_e11b119ce6_z.jpg[/attachment:luezofmt]
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 22, 2011, 04:37:55 PM
[attachment=1:63drx7d8]tahrir.jpg[/attachment:63drx7d8]

This is how the Tahrir Square in Cairo looked like starting from the 25th of this month. People slept on the streets and demanded the president to step down. There were over 3 Million Egyptians demonstrating.


This is the Revolution in Bahrain. Many people were killed there too by the governmet!!!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Together we are strong

You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.
Abraham Lincoln

Thank you Michael for letting me discover the truth!

I lost the bet, Sarahli won it! ! ! loool


Offline DancingTheDream

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 22, 2011, 11:22:07 PM
Like it or not, the whole volatility in the middle east is nothing to do with democracy but everything to do with safeguarding oil. It wouldn't surprise me one bit if the USA had a hand in all of this so they can destabilise the region and then work some cushy oil deals for themselves.
Blair has had his hand in that tactic, too.

This aint about freedom and democracy...  its about oil and money!!

Look at Libya...    its an oil rich nation... and the proverbial is about to well and truly hit the fan!

Im all for Gadaffi getting the heave-ho.  Im all for people fighting for a democratic country, free of dictatorship.  Im just finding this all very suspicious.  Its like it is the beginning of the end.

I keep thinking about the ending of Planet of the Apes... where the lead character realises that the human race blew itself up.  
The World is about to become a much more scarier, volatile place from now on.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »

RunFaYaLife

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Re: Bahrain protests banned as military tightens grip

  • on: February 22, 2011, 11:42:10 PM
Let me repeat myself WE-The USA did not have anything to do with this!
As was stated earlier it ALL started in Tunisia by a fruit farmer!

Quote
U.S. stocks tumbled as escalating tensions in the Middle East and North Africa sent oil prices soaring.

European markets also declined on the geopolitical turmoil, adding to the previous session's heavy losses. Italy's stock market was closed for most of the day because of what the exchange said was a technical glitch, and stocks fell when trading began in the afternoon. The Stoxx Europe 600 index dropped 0.6% to 285.38.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 178.46 points, or 1.4%, to 12212.79. It was the biggest percentage and point drop since Nov. 16. The Standard & Poor's 500-stock index dropped 2.1% to 1315.44, and the Nasdaq Composite fell 2.7% to 2756.42.

Investors said the U.S. stock market had been ready for a pullback, as major indexes had risen for 16 of the past 20 sessions to reach 2½-year highs on Friday. U.S. markets were closed Monday for a holiday.

Wal-Mart Stores weighed on the Dow, sliding 3.1% after the retailer's fiscal fourth-quarter profit rose 27%, capitalizing on strength in its international business, but its U.S. operations continued to struggle. Wal-Mart posted its seventh consecutive quarter of lower U.S. same-store sales, and fourth-quarter revenue fell short of expectations.

Bank of America fell 3.9% after saying its credit-card subsidiary was restating eight quarters of reports to regulators because it took a $20.3 billion write-down due to deteriorating credit and new regulations over the past two years.

Libyan leader Col. Moammar Gadhafi, in a televised speech, defied protesters seeking his removal and vowed to remain in Libya "until the end." Oil prices jumped on fears that supplies from the country, a major crude exporter, will be disrupted.

Compared with Friday's closing level, crude for March delivery surged $7.37 a barrel, or 8.55%, to $93.57 on the New York Mercantile Exchange, the biggest dollar gain since September 2008.

Energy components were among the few gainers in the Dow Industrials, thanks to the rise in oil. Chevron gained 1.6%, while Exxon Mobil rose 1.1%.

In Milan, the stock market was closed for most of the day due to "a technical issue on the price information systems," Borsa Italiana said. When it opened, the benchmark FTSE MIB index fell 1.1% to 21993.96, adding to Monday's 3.6% slump. Italian stocks are seen as particularly sensitive to the Libyan turmoil given Italy's close ties to the country. Oil company Eni fell 0.9% and lender UniCredit /quotes/comstock/23g!ucg (IT:UCG 1.84, -0.03, -1.82%) dropped 1.8%, following steep falls Monday.

Elsewhere, London's FTSE 100 fell 0.3% to 5996.76, Frankfurt's DAX was marginally lower at 7318.35 and Paris's CAC 40 slumped 1.2% to 4050.27.

Airlines ranked among the hardest-hit stocks because of the spike in oil prices. Air France-KLM dropped 3% in Paris, and easyJet /quotes/comstock/23s!a:ezj (UK:EZJ 366.00, 0.00, 0.00%) fell 2.9% in London.

In London, defense-related stocks fell on fears the U.K. might make further cuts to its military budget. BAE Systems was the biggest decliner on the FTSE 100, down 4.3%, while Rolls-Royce fell 1.5% and Smiths Group dropped 0.9%.

The Swiss franc rose sharply against the dollar as traders sought safety.

The dollar was at 0.9385 franc in late New York trade, down from 0.9471 franc Monday. The euro slipped to $1.3653 from $1.3675.

Gold for February delivery climbed $12.30 per troy ounce, or 0.9%, to $1400.50 on the Comex division of Nymex.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/europe ... 2-22-21600

Not to mention that Moamer Kadhafi is INSANE.
Watch his unintelligible speech on CNN.

UHHHHHHHHH!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »