Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

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Offline wishingstar

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Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 18, 2011, 10:04:21 AM
OK....we have This Is It. Michael's last moments of entertaining recorded for all to see. Really? No, the more I watch it, I know what this film is now. It's a rock opera to end all rock operas. I firmly believe there is an underlying story we are missing, the world is missing. Watch This Is It from a storytellers perspective. We have the hero of the story proclaiming his love in the opening. We have a group of chosen people (dancers) who want to learn all they can from him. We fall in love with the hero all over again through his message of love, dance and music.  He dies...ripping our hearts out. The world is left to wonder one path....Dr. Murray, the trial, the family etc. The other is a path of deception, mystery, intrigue, magic....open only to those who know where to look.....into the path of hoax. We have not two, but three parallel pathways......people who don't know about the hoax, people who are "unbelievers" and finally "believers". I think believers have the upper hand and will gain more knowledge quicker. However, we have created a world within a world.....different forums, videos etc. An interesting social aspect indeed. So, This Is It......a totally new type of interactive entertainment. I believe the story itself is based on a classic retelling of something.....that is where I am struggling. I know Bible stories, classic literature etc. I just can't pinpoint the exact story. I feel it's a combination of perhaps a Bible story and maybe Shakespeare and Poe. It's biblical, it's a tragedy and scary......a trifecta of modern literature:
This Is It

The whole hoax feeling with TII is really odd. I can't shake that we are seeing, experiencing and living something totally new. It would not surprise me at all to learn Michael was able to incorporate some element of truth or sting into it all. His life had always been in danger......a handsome, talented, rich, powerful, black man...yes, danger. Maybe he found a way to beat down the threats. I hope. Sony, Mottola, Sneddon.....take your pick....there are so many.

I do absolutely believe there is a serious side to all this. It's entertainment..but it's educational, name clearing, Sony trapping, court stinging, dirty doc catchin' entertainment!   
I think of Michael's career as the Second Greatest Story Ever Told.......the original Greatest Story Ever Told is a movie from 1965 <!-- m -->http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059245/<!-- m -->
No, I am not equating him to Jesus....just that his career and storytelling ability are amazing.
The story started long before TII. TII became the focal point after the death of the hero.
I still think TII mirrors some famous work of literature...I just can't pinpoint it. It's not Romeo and Juliet....although, Hamlet has come to mind. My first thought about a return......unfortunately, was 4 years. Because that's what he says in TII. What piece of literature talks about 4 years? Any come to mind?
I am hoping to pinpoint a piece of literature soon......please let me know if you think of any good fits.  The Raven, Hamlet, anything you think might fit.  I have also looked at TII as a parable.  We indeed have all the makings of a great parable.  I know the lessons learned will never be forgotten. 
I hope you all have a wonderful, blessed week!  Thanks for reading my random thoughts on This Is It

Blessings Always
« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 11:06:45 AM by wishingstar »

Offline Steph22

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 18, 2011, 10:32:01 AM
What comes to my mind would be William Faulkner's Absolom Absolom.

Quote
Charles Bon became engaged to Judith Sutpen. The engagement was suddenly broken off for a probation period of four years. In the meantime, the Civil War began. Charles and Henry served together. Thomas Sutpen became a colonel.
Goodhue Coldfield took a disdainful stand against the war. He barricaded himself in his attic and his daughter, Rosa, was forced to put his food in a basket let down by a long rope. His store was looted by Confederate soldiers. One night, alone in his attic, he died.
Judith, in the meantime, had waited patiently for her lover. She carried his letter, written at the end of the four-year period, to Quentin's grandmother. Sometime later on Wash Jones, a tenant on the Sutpen plantation, came to Miss Rosa's door with the crude announcement that Charles Bon was dead, killed at the gate of the plantation by his half brother and former friend.

That's ahort summary of the part I mean but it's probably not really what you are looking for!?

But what I found interesting is an analysis of the book on Wikipedia. http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absalom,_Absalom!#Analysis

Quote
Absalom, Absalom! juxtaposes ostensible fact, informed guesswork, and outright speculation, with the implication that any and all reconstructions of the past remain irretrievable and therefore imaginative. Faulkner, however, stated that although none of the narrators got the facts right, since "no one individual can look at truth", there is a truth and the reader can ultimately know it.[2] While many critics have tried to reconstruct the truth behind the Rashomon-like narratives, or to show that such a reconstruction cannot be done with certainty or even that there are factual and logical inconsistencies that cannot be overcome, some critics have stated that, fictional truth being an oxymoron, it is best to take the story as a given, and regard it on the level of myth and archetype, a fable that allows us to glimpse the deepest levels of the unconscious and thus better understand the people who accept (and are ruled by) that myth—Southerners in general and Quentin Compson in particular.[3]  
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Offline jacilovesmichael

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 18, 2011, 11:48:43 AM
This is so interesting and something I've thought of many times. Thank you for articulating it so well! I definitely think this is something completely new that we are experiencing.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
What you have just witnessed could be the end of a particularly terrifying nightmare. It isn’t. It’s the beginning.


Offline wishingstar

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 19, 2011, 12:55:56 AM
@steph22.......
it's interesting you bring up Faulkner.  A couple of things had hit me also with him....
the main character from As I Lay Dying, Addie, talks about what she is thinking...from her casket, after her death.
The style of writing is known as "stream of consciousness"....giving a narrative view of someone's thought process...basically.  It's sort of difficult to explain.  Anyways......yes, Faulkner is indeed a relevant author.....love your points with Absalom,Absalom!  Thank you for mentioning him....I am off to read more!

@jacilovesmichael.......
Thank you for being so sweet......great minds think alike!!!!

Thanks for the response...I watched TII again tonight..still have the same vibe...a love story, a tragedy and a mystery!

Blessings Always!
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Offline Steph22

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 19, 2011, 03:58:21 AM
After you brought up that subject yesterday I went and did a little research. I have a thing for literature and old classics :) So thank you for bringing it up :)  
Another author I thought is worth mentioning here is Leo Tolstoy. The story I'm referring to is Anna Karenina. It was published 1878. The story doesn't fit really into the TII subject but I find the themes of the novel very interesting.
http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Karenina#Major_themes

Here are some extracts from Wikpedia that caught my attention:

Quote
Anna Karenina is commonly thought to explore the themes of hypocrisy, jealousy, faith, fidelity, family, marriage, society, progress, carnal desire and passion
 

Quote
one of the novel's key messages is that "no one may build their happiness on another's pain."  

Quote
Many of the novel's themes can also be found in Tolstoy's A Confession, his first-person rumination about the nature of life and faith, written just two years after the publication of Anna Karenina.
In this book, Tolstoy describes his dissatisfaction with the hypocrisy of his social class:
“   Every time I tried to display my innermost desires – a wish to be morally good – I met with contempt and scorn, and as soon as I gave in to base desires I was praised and encouraged.
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Offline Steph22

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 19, 2011, 06:48:17 AM
I'm sorry if I'm coming up with something new again. Hope you don't mind that I'm pouring out my ideas here. If anybody wonders if I don't have a life :)  I'm having a day off today and decided to do some more reseach.

I thought about how MJ used to LOVE books. He used to have a library with over 10,000 books in Neverland. What I didn't know was what his favorite books might be or his favorite author. I've been looking it up and it turns out one of his favorite books was "Jonathan Livingston Seagull" by Richard Bach.

Quote
Part One  :arrow: kinda describes to me MJ's life before the "death"
The Part One of the book finds young Jonathan Livingston frustrated with the meaningless materialism and conformity and limitation of the seagull life. He is seized with a passion for flight of all kinds, and his soul soars as he experiments with exhilarating challenges of daring and triumphant aerial feats. Eventually, his lack of conformity to the limited seagull life leads him into conflict with his flock, and they turn their backs on him, casting him out of their society and exiling him. Not deterred by this, Jonathan continues his efforts to reach higher and higher flight goals, finding he is often successful but eventually he can fly no higher. He is then met by two radiant, loving seagulls who explain to him that he has learned much, and that they are there now to teach him more.
[edit]Part Two :arrow: the "death"
In the second Part, Jonathan transcends into a society where all the gulls enjoy flying. He is only capable of this after practicing hard alone for a long time (described in the first part). In this other society, real respect emerges as a contrast of the coercive force that was keeping the former "Breakfast Flock" together. The learning process, linking the highly experienced teacher and the diligent student, is raised into almost sacred levels, suggesting that this may be the true relation between human and God. Because of this, each has been described as believing that human and God, regardless of the all immense difference, are sharing something of great importance that can bind them together: "You've got to understand that a seagull is an unlimited idea of freedom, an image of the Great Gull." He realizes that you have to be true to yourself: "You have the freedom to be yourself, your true self, here and now, and nothing can stand in your way".
[edit]Part Three :arrow: the comeback
In the third part of the book are the last words of Jonathan's teacher: "Keep working on love." Through his teachings, Jonathan understands that the spirit cannot be really free without the ability to forgive, and that the way to progress leads—for him, at least—through becoming a teacher, not just through working hard as a student. Jonathan returns to the Breakfast Flock to share his newly discovered ideals and the recent tremendous experience, ready for the difficult fight against the current rules of that society. The ability to forgive seems to be a mandatory "passing condition."
"Do you want to fly so much that you will forgive the Flock, and learn, and go back to them one day and work to help them know?" Jonathan asks his first student, Fletcher Lynd Seagull, before getting into any further talks. The idea that the stronger can reach more by leaving the weaker friends behind seems totally rejected.
Hence, love, deserved respect, and forgiveness all seem to be equally important to the freedom from the pressure to obey the rules just because they are commonly accepted.

what do you guys think of that?
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Offline jacilovesmichael

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 19, 2011, 09:22:53 AM
Quote from: "Steph22"
I'm sorry if I'm coming up with something new again. Hope you don't mind that I'm pouring out my ideas here. If anybody wonders if I don't have a life :)  I'm having a day off today and decided to do some more reseach.

I thought about how MJ used to LOVE books. He used to have a library with over 10,000 books in Neverland. What I didn't know was what his favorite books might be or his favorite author. I've been looking it up and it turns out one of his favorite books was "Jonathan Livingston Seagull" by Richard Bach.

Quote
Part One  :arrow: kinda describes to me MJ's life before the "death"
The Part One of the book finds young Jonathan Livingston frustrated with the meaningless materialism and conformity and limitation of the seagull life. He is seized with a passion for flight of all kinds, and his soul soars as he experiments with exhilarating challenges of daring and triumphant aerial feats. Eventually, his lack of conformity to the limited seagull life leads him into conflict with his flock, and they turn their backs on him, casting him out of their society and exiling him. Not deterred by this, Jonathan continues his efforts to reach higher and higher flight goals, finding he is often successful but eventually he can fly no higher. He is then met by two radiant, loving seagulls who explain to him that he has learned much, and that they are there now to teach him more.
[edit]Part Two :arrow: the "death"
In the second Part, Jonathan transcends into a society where all the gulls enjoy flying. He is only capable of this after practicing hard alone for a long time (described in the first part). In this other society, real respect emerges as a contrast of the coercive force that was keeping the former "Breakfast Flock" together. The learning process, linking the highly experienced teacher and the diligent student, is raised into almost sacred levels, suggesting that this may be the true relation between human and God. Because of this, each has been described as believing that human and God, regardless of the all immense difference, are sharing something of great importance that can bind them together: "You've got to understand that a seagull is an unlimited idea of freedom, an image of the Great Gull." He realizes that you have to be true to yourself: "You have the freedom to be yourself, your true self, here and now, and nothing can stand in your way".
[edit]Part Three :arrow: the comeback
In the third part of the book are the last words of Jonathan's teacher: "Keep working on love." Through his teachings, Jonathan understands that the spirit cannot be really free without the ability to forgive, and that the way to progress leads—for him, at least—through becoming a teacher, not just through working hard as a student. Jonathan returns to the Breakfast Flock to share his newly discovered ideals and the recent tremendous experience, ready for the difficult fight against the current rules of that society. The ability to forgive seems to be a mandatory "passing condition."
"Do you want to fly so much that you will forgive the Flock, and learn, and go back to them one day and work to help them know?" Jonathan asks his first student, Fletcher Lynd Seagull, before getting into any further talks. The idea that the stronger can reach more by leaving the weaker friends behind seems totally rejected.
Hence, love, deserved respect, and forgiveness all seem to be equally important to the freedom from the pressure to obey the rules just because they are commonly accepted.

what do you guys think of that?

Wow! Lots of similarities. This part stuck out to me: "Do you want to fly so much that you will forgive the Flock, and learn, and go back to them one day and work to help them know?"

Awakening...awareness...hope  :)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
What you have just witnessed could be the end of a particularly terrifying nightmare. It isn’t. It’s the beginning.


Offline wishingstar

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 19, 2011, 06:45:46 PM
One of my favorite Tolstoy quotes (I used here a couple of times)

"Everything I know, I know because of love."

@steph22: fantastic reading! thank you so much for sharing it.  I know some, but you are amazing....how long have you studied Lit?

@ jacilovesmichael:  yes, that struck me as well!  really interesting parallels of thought..........

Blessings Always!
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Offline Steph22

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 20, 2011, 04:49:38 AM
awww thank you so much wishingstar :)
I'm just about to graduate from college. My major is not literature but American Studies. However, this is highly linked to reading tooooons of books and research :)

last night, I had another idea. I will elaborate on that later today. :)

have a blessed day everyone penguin/
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Offline jackieblue64

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: May 24, 2011, 07:48:14 PM
TII is about a total WAKE UP to humanity- UNIVERSAL TRUTHS of who and what we are. Merge EVERY sequence in the movie with EVERY song/short film MJ did from the beginning.  Golden Age of Enlightenment is upon us and MJ is leading the way of LIGHT.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoRjQWbn ... ideo_title
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Offline mjj4ever777

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: June 14, 2011, 06:23:18 PM
Quote from: "jackieblue64"
TII is about a total WAKE UP to humanity- UNIVERSAL TRUTHS of who and what we are. Merge EVERY sequence in the movie with EVERY song/short film MJ did from the beginning.  Golden Age of Enlightenment is upon us and MJ is leading the way of LIGHT.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoRjQWbn ... ideo_title


I wish I had seen this earlier! What an excellent video Jackieblue64,my husband and  I agree with this 100%. This is path we took and it makes so much sense!! Thank you for posting this, I hope others watch this. The "hoax" is just the "entertainment" and what you say in your video, is the
message" of what is about to happen.
Blessings Love and Light to you! :) <3 bearhug
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Offline CC

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Re: Looking at This Is It In a Different Way

  • on: June 15, 2011, 09:41:21 AM
i will read it later! thanks!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Guest »
Some men see things as they are and say: WHY?
I dream things that never were and say: WHY NOT?