Japan tsunami - one year ago today

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Offline everlastinglove_MJ

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Japan tsunami - one year ago today

  • on: March 11, 2012, 12:32:57 PM
See how Japan has rebuilt in the 11 months since the earthquake and tsunami
National Post Staff Feb 9, 2012 – 8:00 AM ET | Last Updated: Feb 14, 2012 11:37 AM ET

Photos compiled by Zoran Bozicevic and words by Michael Higgins
 


Japan’s Reconstruction Agency will be inaugurated Friday, almost 11 months after an earthquake and tsunami devastated the country. The agency will streamline the process to help municipalities, set up special reconstruction zones and provide subsidies for disaster-hit local governments.
 
YASUYOSHI CHIBA/TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images

This combination of pictures shows a catamaran sightseeing boat washed by the tsunami onto a two-storey tourist home in Otsuchi, Iwate prefecture on April 16, 2011 (top) and the same area on January 16, 2012 (bottom).
.
245 — Cost in billions of dollars of the post disaster reconstruction package.
 
15,846 — Number of dead.
 
3,320 — People still missing.
 
2 — Number of missing people found dead this year.
 
240 — Number of orphans in the three most severely affected prefectures, Miyagi, Iwate and Fukushima.
 
16 — Million tons of disaster waste in Miyagi Prefecture, one of the hardest hit areas of Japan.
 
2.4 — Drop in millions of tourists to Japan in 2011 from a year previously.
 
6 — Approximate months lost in the average life expectancy for a Japanese woman following the disasters, down from 86.4 years in 2010 to 85.9 in 2011.
 
3 — Approximate months lost in the average life expectancy for a Japanese man, down from 79.5 years in 2010 to 79.27 in 2011.
 
National Post
http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/02/09/see-how-japan-has-rebuilt-in-the-11-months-since-the-earthquake-and-tsunami/

One year ago today the eartquake and tsunami hit Japan. This tragedy will never be forgotten. I hope and pray that this will never happen again.  :(  Love and respect to the people in Fukushima and to the people who're re-building it. I found a link for the documentary "Children of the Tsunami". How do these children cope with their fear and grief? One girl writes in a diary to handle her fear and loss of her grandfather. Every day she and her dad measure the radiation levels on the street. If they are too high, she can't play outside because of the high health risk. A boy tells about his class, he lost 13 of the 17 class mates. He believes that they're still going to school. Children and teachers are still missing. It was heartbreaking and I felt sad when I watched this and I have huge respect for these wise children and for the way they are adapted to their changed lives.

http://watchdocumentary.com/watch/children-of-the-tsunami-video_83ed2c139.html

"Exploring the country's tsunami last year through the eyes of children who witnessed the disaster. The programme features testimonies from youngsters at two schools - one where 74 pupils were killed by the giant wave, and the other close to the Fukushima power plant, where vital cooling systems were knocked out, triggering radiation leaks and forcing the evacuation of thousands of people. "

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWfeQ1HWJxY [/youtube]

Quote
Message from Mark McTamney
owner of English Bug
http://www.englishbug.com
----------
We are a small English School in Fujinomiya City, near Mt Fuji. While we were a long way away from the epicenter of the Tohoku earthquake, we certainly felt it and experienced the uncertainty that followed in the following days/weeks and months. We want to show people that although it was an extremely difficult time for all of Japan, we have come through it and we can still manage a smile or two.
 
Thanks to the Tyler Foundation for providing this platform for us and we hope other schools and groups from around the world will join in submitting their videos. Shine on!!
----------
SING FOR JAPAN!
----------
As Japan remembers the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the Tohoku region on March 11, it is important to remind Japan that we haven't forgotten.

The Tyler Foundation mobilized its resources and launched the Shine On! Tohoku Children's Support Program. To date, close to 9,000 children have received psychosocial support.

And in collaboration with the Sakari Elementary School in the Ofunato region, we recorded the song Who I Want to Be a bold and hopeful song of promise.

Originally sung by Rie Fu, we invited the global community to sing this song for Japan. We are asked groups of all ages to submit their videos to be posted on our websites for all of Japan to see and to be reminded that we have not forgotten.
----------
For more information about how we are helping kids with cancer in Japan:
http://www.tylershineon.org

To purchase the song, cd or to find out more about the music:
http://www.shineonsongs.org

More about our Shine On! Tohoku Children's Support Program and Shine On! Smile Ambassador:
http://www.tylershineon.org/programs/shine-on-smile-ambassador/
 

L.O.V.E.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2012, 02:55:50 PM by everlastinglove_MJ »
It's all for L.O.V.E.

Offline hesouttamylife

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Re: Japan tsunami - one year ago today

  • on: March 11, 2012, 12:52:11 PM
I watched an interview with this young woman on the television on Friday night and it blew me away.  It is so inspiring to see how strong and able is the human ability when people are faithful and disciplined and believe.  They have done so much by first knowing that orderly participation by all gets things accomplished, no matter how big or insurmountable a task appears.  It can be done.  Many of the people assisting in the re-building lost whole families and communities of friends, still they have so much compassion for those who remain.  Awesome.  This is what humanity looks like.  Bless them all.
"Don't stop this child, He's the father of man
Don't cross his way, He's part of the plan
I am that child, but so are you
You've just forgotten, Just lost the clue.”

MJ "Magical Child"
Still Rocking my World…
   and leaving me Speechless!

“True goodbyes are the ones never said

Offline everlastinglove_MJ

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Re: Japan tsunami - one year ago today

  • on: March 11, 2012, 06:52:54 PM
I watched an interview with this young woman on the television on Friday night and it blew me away.  It is so inspiring to see how strong and able is the human ability when people are faithful and disciplined and believe.  They have done so much by first knowing that orderly participation by all gets things accomplished, no matter how big or insurmountable a task appears.  It can be done.  Many of the people assisting in the re-building lost whole families and communities of friends, still they have so much compassion for those who remain.  Awesome.  This is what humanity looks like.  Bless them all.

Quote
Many of the people assisting in the re-building lost whole families and communities of friends, still they have so much compassion for those who remain.  Awesome.  This is what humanity looks like.  Bless them all. 

I so agree Hesouttamylife! Inspite of their own loss and grief there is so much unity and care for each other. LOVE and respect to them.

L.O.V.E. always 
It's all for L.O.V.E.

Offline blankie

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Re: Japan tsunami - one year ago today

  • on: March 11, 2012, 07:00:26 PM
I watched an interview with this young woman on the television on Friday night and it blew me away.  It is so inspiring to see how strong and able is the human ability when people are faithful and disciplined and believe.  They have done so much by first knowing that orderly participation by all gets things accomplished, no matter how big or insurmountable a task appears.  It can be done.  Many of the people assisting in the re-building lost whole families and communities of friends, still they have so much compassion for those who remain.  Awesome.  This is what humanity looks like.  Bless them all.

Quote
Many of the people assisting in the re-building lost whole families and communities of friends, still they have so much compassion for those who remain.  Awesome.  This is what humanity looks like.  Bless them all. 

I so agree Hesouttamylife! Inspite of their own loss and grief there is so much unity and care for each other. LOVE and respect to them.

L.O.V.E. always 



Absolutely agree
LOVE YOU MORE

Offline hesouttamylife

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Re: Japan tsunami - one year ago today

  • on: March 11, 2012, 07:19:05 PM
Not I, only by His grace.  My prayers still go up for them.  So many people died.  Today for them is one of those first I spoke about.  Their lives are forever changed.  It will be a long time before their healing truly even begins.  The pain they must feel, I cannot even begin to imagine.  I pray for them constantly.  We never know when disaster will come our way, but it appears almost certain if we live long enough.  The earth is changing and it appears that no one is out of harm’s way.  We just have to love each other each and every day as if it were our last. 
"Don't stop this child, He's the father of man
Don't cross his way, He's part of the plan
I am that child, but so are you
You've just forgotten, Just lost the clue.”

MJ "Magical Child"
Still Rocking my World…
   and leaving me Speechless!

“True goodbyes are the ones never said

Offline Grace

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Re: Japan tsunami - one year ago today

  • on: March 12, 2012, 08:36:58 AM
Thank you for reminding us.

This gives some impressions of  the 78 earthquakes that happened on March 11, 2011 (turn back the date and watch): http://www.japanquakemap.com/

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVbTOgF2N90&feature=related[/youtube]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVbTOgF2N90&feature=related


Quote
Chronology of major events related to the nuclear crisis
Kyodo 

March 11, 2011 — The magnitude 9 earthquake and subsequent tsunami cause a station blackout at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant, crippling reactors 1 through 4. The government declares an emergency and
orders residents living within 3 km of the plant to evacuate.
March 12 — Prime Minister Naoto Kan inspects the plant. A hydrogen explosion rips through the No. 1
reactor building. The evacuation zone is expanded to a 10-km radius and later to 20 km.
March 14 — The No. 3 reactor building suffers a hydrogen explosion.
March 15 — A hydrogen explosion occurs in the No. 4 reactor building.
March 17 — Ground Self-Defense Force helicopters drop water to cool off spent fuel rods in the No. 3
reactor's storage pool. Fire engines spray water from the ground.
March 20 — Reactors 5 and 6 achieve cold shutdown.
April 2 — Highly radioactive water is confirmed flowing into the sea from reactor 2.
April 12 — The government raises the crisis severity level to 7, the highest on the international scale,
bringing it on par with the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.
April 17 — The government and Tokyo Electric Power Co. announce a two-phase road map to bring the
crisis under control.
April 22 — The government designates a 20-km radius around the plant as a no-go zone, while setting
a ring 20 km to 30 km from the plant as an area that will have to be evacuated if further emergencies
develop. In addition, evacuation is advised but not mandatory for an area beginning at the 20-km line
and stretching beyond 30 km.
June 7 — The government admits meltdowns occurred in the cores of reactors 1, 2 and 3.
June 27 — Tepco starts cooling the damaged reactors using water decontaminated through a newly
installed water treatment system.
July 19 — The government and Tepco say "Step 1" of the road map is largely completed and revise
the conditions for completing the second phase and containing the crisis.
Sept. 8 — New Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda visits the crippled plant for the first time.
Sept. 19 — Nuclear disaster minister Goshi Hosono announces a plan at a meeting of the International
Atomic Energy Agency to move the deadline for cold shutdown forward to the yearend instead of mid-January.
Sept. 28 — Temperatures at the bottom of the pressure vessels for reactors 1, 2 and 3 fall below
100 degrees.
Sept. 30 — The evacuation preparation zones are lifted.
Nov. 4 — The government decides to provide Tepco with ¥891 billion to help pay its massive compensation
bills.
Dec. 2 — Tepco unveils an interim report on an in-house investigation blaming the accident on a tsunami
of unprecedented scope, though other disclosures show it was warned in advance.
Dec. 16 — The government declares the remaining reactors are in cold shutdown, completing the road
map's second phase.
Dec. 21 — The government and Tepco announce a plan to scrap reactors 1 through 4 in the next 30 to 40
years.
Dec. 26 — The government decides to reclassify the Fukushima evacuation zones into three categories,
depending on radiation levels. The government's accident investigation panel says in an interim report that
the government and Tepco responded poorly to the crisis.
Jan. 26 — The government announces a plan to complete decontamination work in some evacuation areas
by March 2014.
Feb. 13 — The government decides to offer Tepco an additional ¥689.4 billion for compensation payments.
Feb. 28 — A private-sector panel says Kan's response to the crisis created unnecessary confusion.
He made sure Tepco's staff didn't flee.
 
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20120312a9.html



Japan is far from having restructured what was taken from them.

Many of those who lost their families don't even know where to weep for them.
Many of those who lost their homes, houses and businesses are still waiting for compensation.
Much farm land is poisoned by salt and chemicals.
Water at Fukushima shores is as radioactive as the land, even 400 km offshore.
People still living in the area will most likely die of radiation damages to their health, no matter how many times they check the radiation level and follow official statements in doing so.

Tepco has falsified documents and lied, the government has not reacted appropriately and still doesn't (see above: "Feb. 13 — The government decides to offer Tepco an additional ¥689.4 billion for compensation payments"). Government is still hesitating what to do while 10,000s are still living under temporary housing conditions, waiting for any improvements. Not only silence, waiting out and "managing" figures is to be found, it is also a strange "adjusting" to the situation (or adjusting the situation to priorities - TDCAU is saying hello):

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVQNrVfhIEU[/youtube]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVQNrVfhIEU

These are the temporary housing conditions for too many still today:


More:
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2012/03/japans_nuclear_refugees.html


There's however also these news about private initiatives who have supplied data, human support, materials and more. They give hope that conditions will get better and relief will be brought to those suffering.

Updated data on radiation (collected by volunteers): http://blog.safecast.org/maps/


Quote
The Christian Science Monitor - CSMonitor.com 
Japan's Fukushima disaster encourages new spirit of volunteerism
One year after Japan's Fukushima disaster, some 1 million people have taken the time to volunteer in the disaster zone, unprecedented in Japan.
 

  By Take Kambayashi, Correspondent                       
posted March 7, 2012 at 4:06 pm EST

 Ishinomaki, Japan   On a brisk Saturday afternoon, Junko Yokota and her husband, Ryosuke, are delivering a 6-lb. bag of rice to elderly residents in a temporary housing unit for victims of the March 11, 2011 tsunami.
To make that delivery, the couple took a night bus from Tokyo after work on Friday to Ishinomaki, 220 miles northeast of the Japanese capital.

The Yokotas were among the estimated 1 million volunteers who traveled to the disaster-hit region to volunteer after the March 11 massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami last year, which left more than 15,800 people dead and nearly 3,300 missing.

The couple, like many other Japanese, had never been involved in volunteer work but were spurred by images and stories of need following the biggest earthquake they had experienced, says Junko, a web designer. Their decision to volunteer and to continue volunteering almost a year after the disaster highlights a shift in Japan from seeing civic duties as largely the government’s responsibility to taking individual or private initiative. 

When they joined official volunteer efforts, they were surprised at how much help was needed. “I was so shocked to see the extent of the damage,” Junko recalls. Since their first trip in June, they have made a trip to the region at least once a month to help out.Volunteerism picks up Japan doesn't traditionally have a deeply entrenched sense of volunteerism. But it has grown in the past two decades as more people have begun to help out following natural disasters.

After there were serious delays in relief operations following the 1995 earthquake in Kobe, which killed more than 6,400 people, hundreds of thousands of citizens flocked to the scene in an unprecedented offer of assistance.

Since then, volunteer groups and nonprofit organizations have sprung up across Japan.  Analysts say the disasters and slow government response encouraged a new trend that is mutually beneficial to both the volunteers and the communities in which they serve. “I’m quite confident that involvement in volunteer work enriches people,” says Ken Takata,  professor of sociology at Tsuru University in Yamanashi.

According to the Japanese Council of Social Welfare, the number of those who volunteered through municipalities in the region reached 930,000 as of mid-February.  But many others took part through citizens groups, so the actual number is believed to be much higher, local leaders said.

“I’m grateful for their work and enjoy talking to them,” says Hiroko Sakai, a disaster victim in Ishinomaki, who received rice from the Yokotas.

Ms. Sakai, who has lived in temporary housing for nine months, says she lost 10 neighbors in the disaster.Volunteers unexpectedly enrichedIt’s a familiar story. Yuma Okubo’s grandparents were also disaster victims: Their house in Ofunato was swept away by the tsunami.

Mr. Okubo, a sociology major at Tsuru University, visited his grandparents at an emergency shelter in the city, when he decided to start volunteering.
He got unexpected education from the experience.
“I have learned a lot by interacting with disaster victims and other volunteers,” says Okubo, who adds he had no interest in volunteerism before. The experience “has expanded my view after meeting people with very different ideas.”

Okubo then organized a volunteer group at the university as he wanted other students to have similar experience. The group has traveled to the disaster zone seven times.
His professor, Mr. Takata, says he’s seen the benefit volunteer work provides in his students.
“Those who join volunteer activities meet many people they would otherwise never meet. They also learn a variety of things while coordinating their activities and caring about others,” he says.

Seiji Yoshimura became one of the leaders of impromptu volunteer groups in Kobe.  Mr. Yoshimura has also helped with other relief operations, including the 1999 Taiwan earthquake, the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and the 2008 Sichuan earthquake.
At daybreak following the March 11 disaster, Yoshimura was in the coastal areas of Miyagi Prefecture, the hardest-hit region, to help rescue victims.

Now co-founder of volunteer group Open Japan Kizuna in Ishinomaki, Yoshimura says that this time, more people were ready to volunteer than he’d seen in any other disaster.Postal workers to the rescueHirokazu Murano, postmaster in Yokohama, has organized “volunteer tours” for postal workers to help clean up in the aftermath of the disaster. In mid-February, one of the projects that Mr. Murano and 70 other postal workers helped out with involved shovelling away mud from a 120-year-old house in Ishinomaki. “I’ve learned there are so many people who want to be of service,” Murano says.

Nobuaki Minami, who works for an IT company in Tokyo, regretted not having volunteered following a 6.8-magnitude quake in 2004 that jolted Niigata, in central Japan, killing 68 people and injuring nearly 5,000.
Mr. Minami now volunteers in the Miyagi  disaster zone every month.
“I’m not the type of person who believes [an] image on television,” Minami says. “The media report the best and the worst, not in-between. So, I wanted to see for myself.”
Minami says his involvement has changed his outlook.
“At the very beginning, I was doing volunteer work with a sense of mission. But soon this has become part of my life,” Minami says.
http://www.csmonitor.com/layout/set/print/content/view/print/478015


Blessings.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2012, 05:00:38 PM by Grace »
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Offline chappie

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Re: Japan tsunami - one year ago today

  • on: March 12, 2012, 01:14:41 PM
What about the radioactive shit that is still coming out of the reactors every day.....
The zone had to be a least 500 km.
What about all the people that where send to help for weeks to search for victims etc.
There will be a lot of more victims in the coming years from the radioactivity and not only in Japan.
The Japanese government lies but your governement too.
They know this shit will go on and on for years and not only in Japan.
Here in Belgium we have the same shit with a plant near the France border.
From an insider who checks radioactivity for the belgium government I know that radioactivity in the water and earth in that region is very high.
But they are not allowed to speak about it.
Thats how it works.
Keep your mouth shut or you are out of work.


 

Offline Tink

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Re: Japan tsunami - one year ago today

  • on: March 12, 2012, 09:56:32 PM
What about the cats & dogs left locked up in the houses, who starved to death!? :'(
Then those turned loose outside, scrounging for scraps...
Some rescues came, helped as best as they could.

You should've seen the nightmare Northridge Quake brought out in people here. I barely survived,
along with my kitty. Lost almost everything, even bolted down. Most pets perished...cash was all anyone was taking
to save even a pet's life that day.

Just remember: Insurance companies LIE! It was stronger than they said; internal documents said so, but they kept
it below so they didn't have to shell out bigger bucks. It looked like we lived in a war zone!! This put many people
out onto the street, since they'd inherited their homes.

One of the clearest memories I have is of Beverly Hills...those of you outside of America never saw this:
the UZIs private security had, standing outside Tiffany's and all the high end stores! Their windows were blown out,
I didn't have a camera - I was looking for an open hospital for myself, because I had a badly broken leg.
Black & Proud! I'm like the Oracle/Batgirl, who helps Batman in the comic books. I believe in "Comic Book justice."